Will James / KNKX

Seattle Women's March Stretches More Than 3 Miles

At one point Saturday, Seattle's women's march against President Donald Trump stretched from the starting point at Judkins Park all the way to its terminus more than three miles away, at Seattle Center. It was a sea of pink hats and eye-catching signs that spilled through a city where just 8 percent of voters backed Trump on Election Day. "A woman's place is in the resistance," one placard read. “This particular march is about healing ourselves as women," said Evelyn Dickinson, of Mukilteo. ...

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Curious Photo - George Eastman House Collection, ca. 1880

Flip The Script: Sound Effect, Episode 93

This week on Sound Effect , we bring you stories that flip the script. We'll hear stories of reversing the typical expectations in a situation.

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Lisa Hagen Glynn

This week on Jazz Northwest, we're featuring LineUp in concert at the Seattle Art Museum. The quartet was formed in 2015 and debuted at the Ballard Jazz Festival that same year.  

Co-led by pianist and vocalist Dawn Clement and saxophonist Mark Taylor, LineUp has also played at the Earshot Jazz Festival and a monthly series at Tula's in Seattle.  

With no shortage of material to work with, Saturday Night Live satirized a packed week in American politics, reiterating themes imparted by critics for months.

The episode kicked off by lampooning Russia's role in influencing the U.S. election.

My sons remember the bitter cold. And they remember the warmth.

They felt it on the toasty subway car jammed to the doorsills with people at 5 a.m., smiling a knowing smile at strangers riding with us from Columbia Heights to the National Mall and Barack Obama's second presidential inauguration.

Jennifer Wing / knkx

The last time Grays Harbor County voted for a Republican was in 1928, when Herbert Hoover was elected — that is, until last year when it went for Donald J. Trump. 

At one time, Grays Harbor was an economic powerhouse. Tim Quigg grew up there.  He says back then just about anyone could get a job that paid well.

Courtesy Stephanie Coontz

 

Stephanie Coontz is a marriage and family history expert at the Evergreen State College. She’s the author of many books on relationships and marriage, including “The Way We Never Were”. Coontz has spent decades studying the history of marriage and says most of the ideas we have about that institution are completely backwards.

In this conversation with Sound Effect producer Kevin Kniestedt, she started with one of the biggest myths of all: that traditional marriages rely on a man to support the family.

Courtesy of Polly Story-Lebl

 

One big way to flip the script is to mess with the traditional parent-child dynamic. For many, it can seem like parents are these older beings with no life before their children were born. In modern parenting especially, parents don't appear to even have a life when you're a kid.

 

But what if you could meet your mom or dad at a younger age? Maybe even the same age you are now? What would it be like? What would that person be like?

 

Transgender Traveler Builds A Brotherhood

Jan 21, 2017
Malcolm Rene Ribot

Malcolm Rene Ribot has been busy exploring America for the past year and a half. He’s hiked mountains, swam in hidden lakes, touched the waters of both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, and slept under the stars. He’s done this in 48 states and plans on visiting the last two — Hawaii and Alaska — in the next few months.

Everywhere he’s gone, he’s had the company of new friends.

Parker Miles Blohm / knkx

The 2016 presidential election transformed the political narrative across America, including Washington state. Many artists have been emboldened to create in response to this reshuffling of power and ideas. One Seattle musician was uniquely inspired by the perspective of Trump voters.

Seattle musician John Roderick is the front man for local indie rock band The Long Winters. He’s a liberal guy; you might remember his failed bid for Seattle City Council in 2015. In 2016, however, Roderick wrote an anthem for the Trump campaign called “Make America Great Again.”

Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET

As the Women's March on Washington has swelled in support, attracting attention and supporters in the lead-up to Saturday's demonstrations, its name has become something of a misnomer.

Sister marches have been organized in all 50 states, several U.S. territories and countries around the world. They have tried to express solidarity with the aims of the original march: opposition to President Trump's agenda, and support of women's rights and human rights in general.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The National Mall has flooded with pink, as demonstrators descend on the nation's capital Saturday for the Women's March on Washington. Just one day after President Trump's inauguration, marchers from across the country have gathered in the city to protest his agenda and support for women's rights.

The event opened with a rally, to be followed by the march proper — which had a path laid out from a starting position near the U.S. Capitol to its endpoint near the Washington Monument.

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