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This week on Sound Effect, we share stories of fish out of water -- people who find themselves in places they're not sure they belong in. We start by talking to writer Rosette Royale, who after beginning an unlikely friendship, decided to plunge right into a place that always terrified him.

Bryant Carlin

Olympic National Park, with its temperate rainforests and stunning views, exerts a natural pull on many Pacific Northwesterners. But it repelled Seattle writer Rosette Royale. To Royale, the park seemed like a damp, mucky, inhospitable place. "I couldn't figure out why anyone would want to haul a 50-pound pack into the wilderness and camp there for days," he said. "It didn't make sense."

Then he met Bryant Carlin.

Courtesy of Christina Hayes

 

Thanksgiving dinner at the house where Christina Hayes grew up, in the Tri Cities in Eastern Washington, has all the normal things.

Her parents, who met in bible college, are there, along with extended family. There’s turkey and mashed potatoes and pumpkin pie: By all appearances they are a completely typical American family holiday.

“We’re playing, we’re laughing, we’re joking, we’re prepping food. We are like the Hallmark family,” Hayes said.

Photograph of an illustration from Harper's Weekly, January 6, 1866, p. 8-9. Photographer: Warner, Arthur Churchill, 1864-1943, Negative #70x

“Here Come The Brides” was a short-lived television show from the late 1960s. In the show, 1860s Seattle is faced with losing its lumberjacks to other cities because Seattle doesn’t have enough women, until they import a bunch of marriageable ladies from the East Coast, and hilarity ensues.

Kind of an outlandish premise, right? Except that it really happened. Asa Mercer was president of the University of Washington (at the time they had exactly one student), and he took it on himself find wives for the loggers in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Bellamy Pailthorp / KNKX

Feeling out of place takes on whole new dimension when you’re in a foreign country. Perhaps no one understands this more than new immigrants and refugees. And there’s a woman who meets lots of them here in the Seattle area.

Sophorn Sim is an outreach worker for the environmental non-profit, ECOSS, connecting other refugees and new immigrants with resources and ways to live healthier lives.

love by Johnny Lai is licensed under CC by 2.0 http://bit.ly/2DhYaD7

The #MeToo movement has sparked near-daily conversations about sexual harassment and assault. One of the central issues in those conversations is consent.

The New Cool: Kraken Quartet Keeps the Beats

Jan 19, 2018
Evan Monroe Chapman/Four/Ten Media

The four drummers of The Kraken Quartet studied their instruments together at Ithaca College, but few expected the rhythm section to evolve into their own band. Now based in Austin, Texas, their 2017 debut release Separate / Migrate is bringing the four well-deserved attention.

Daymé Arocena at the New Era concert in Havana, 2016
Denise Guerra / courtesy of the artist

No, it's not another story about immigration policy. 

Starting next week, Dimitriou's Jazz Alley in Seattle will be hosting some of the brightest stars in today's Cuban music.  Here's a preview.

Elaine Thompson / File / AP Photo

Hillsides in Washington shaped by glaciers often provide stunning natural beauty that makes people want to live near them. They also come with a high risk of landslides, especially when logged.

The state Commissioner of Public Lands took to the slopes Thursday near Olympia to urge legislators to help state regulators minimize the hazards.

Vicente Hansen performs in the KNKX studios.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Based in New York City and featuring two graduates of Seattle's legendary Roosevelt High School jazz program, the trio Mughal Muesli returned to the West Coast for a tour supporting their debut album Imperial Cereal. We're tracking down carpenters now because they nearly blew the roof off the place.

Live in our studios, Mughal Muesli performed three new compositions that ebbed and flowed with intense grooves, aggressive and muscular sax and bass, and exotic melodies that reflected their musical passions.

Corbin Keech / Flickr/Creative Commons

The National Art Schools in Havana have been at the center of Cuba’s changing history. Established as part of the utopia Fidel Castro and Che Guevara wanted to create, it was later nationalized in the mid-1960s, when art was seen as an extravagance Cuba could not afford.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

The Seattle school board is kicking off its search for a new superintendent with a community town hall on Thursday evening, but labor groups representing teachers and principals are urging the school board to forgo the search and extend current Superintendent Larry Nyland’s contract instead.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

We aren’t aware of our subconscious prejudices and how they affect our actions. Researchers say this implicit bias plays a role in policing, helping to explain why people of color often receive harsher treatment from police than whites. Some police departments are trying to address the problem through training courses.

Paula Wissel / knkx

A federal lawsuit has been filed over the shooting of 20-year-old Tommy Le last June by King County Sheriff's Deputy Cesar Molina in Burien.  

Nancy Leson / KNKX

"Stein, some women spend money on shoes and jewelry.  I buy pots."  And Nancy Leson has the cookware to prove it.

Courtesy of the Pierce County Sheriff's Department

A procession and a memorial service for Pierce County Sheriff's Deputy Daniel McCartney will be held Wednesday near Tacoma.

McCartney, 34, was fatally shot while responding to a burglary in Frederickson on Jan. 7. 

Will James / KNKX

UPDATED Tuesday, Jan. 16, at 4:15 P.M. with a statement from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Federal authorities have begun deportation proceedings against a Washington activist known for criticizing the government's immigration enforcement efforts. 

Maru Mora Villalpando told reporters Tuesday that on Dec. 20 she received a certified letter ordering her to appear before an immigration judge in Seattle. The notice said a court date would be set later.

Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech 55 years ago this August, in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo

An educator who travels the country leading tough conversations about race is speaking Tuesday evening in Tacoma. Eddie Moore Jr. travels the country leading tough conversations about race. His talk tonight is titled “Dr. Martin Luther King: Why Keep Dreaming?”

Will James / KNKX

Leaders in Tacoma have hired two artists-in-residence to help the city grapple with human elements of a homelessness crisis.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

With the abrupt closures of some schools, including ITT Technical Institute campuses in Everett and Seattle, for-profit colleges have gotten more scrutiny in recent years. State Rep. Drew Hansen, D-Bainbridge Island, has proposed excluding for-profit institutions from state financial aid programs.

Will James / KNKX

With crowds of more than 100,000 people, last year's Womxn's March On Seattle was dubbed the largest protest march in city history. Organizers hope to do it again this weekend.

Nancy Erickson at North City Bistro
Jim Wilke / KNKX

This week on Jazz Northwest, we'll sample two new releases with former Seattle musicians now active in New York City, pianist Carmen Staaf and trumpeter Riley Mulherkar.  We will also hear songs from Nancy Erickson and the 200 Trio from recent recording sessions in small, intimate clubs in Shoreline and Ballard, and share some of our best bets for live jazz in the coming week. 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Atlanta, GA 1966
Anonymous / AP

On the day we celebrate the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., let's revisit his thoughts on Jazz and Blues from his address to the 1964 Berlin Jazz Festival:

Rick Bowmer / AP Photo

A public hearing on Gov. Jay Inslee’s proposal to tax fossil fuel emissions takes place Tuesday in Olympia. A coalition of environmental groups is urging people to go and organizing carpools to ensure a strong turnout.

They say the governor’s carbon tax is just one of at least three climate policies they want to see action on this session. And two groups have new polling data to back that up.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

In Seattle Public Schools, there are gaps in achievement between white students and students of color.

According to a recent Stanford University study, black students tested 3.7 grade levels behind their white peers in 2017. The year before, they tested 3.5 grade levels behind.

Courtesy of Nick Morrison

Back in the 1970s, before Nick Morrison was a KNKX staffer, some friends asked him if he would help them smuggle a few bricks of marijuana across the border from Mexico. He said, sure.

What came next? In the beginning, normal drug smuggling stuff. A rambler with secret compartments, a jungle, a mango orchard, an operation that seemed to be going great. But in the end? A single terrifying moment that made Morrison regret his decision - and change his ways.

United States Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexandra Sandoval

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories of imperfect crimes. We start by talking to 88.5’s Nick Morrison, who was once hired to smuggle pot. We then meet a man who was a lifelong prankster, until one prank recalibrated his moral compass.

Courtesy of the FBI

On August 7th, 2006, at 5:13 pm, a group of four men wearing ski masks, body armor, sweatshirts, and carrying assault rifles and pistols burst into a Bank of America branch in Tacoma, Washington. Waiting outside the bank, in the getaway car, was Alex Blum, a "good kid" who had just achieved his lifelong dream of becoming an Army Ranger.

Why did Alex throw away his dream? And how did he end up a bank robber? Alex Blum's cousin, Ben Blum, tackles those questions in his recent book "Ranger Games: A Story of Soldiers, Family, and an Inexplicable Crime."

Derek Erdman

Age 14 is often a time of pushing boundaries, experimenting with the the distinctions between right and wrong. 

Derek Erdman tells his personal story from when he was this awkward age. It involves youthful mischief, an answering machine and the Survivor song, Eye Of The Tiger. 

Derek played a prank that went a little bit too far.  But in the end, this one event helped reshape his moral compass and put him on a better path.

Courtesy of Kathlyn Horan

When Seattle Police Officer Kim Bogucki stepped into the Washington Correctional Facility For Women in Purdy about 10 years ago, she had no intention of starting a non-profit.

Bogucki was doing gang prevention work and went to the prison to ask some of the women for permission to work with their children. The women were distrustful of police and gave Bogucki a chilly reception.

“Probably the last time that those mothers saw police, we were taking them away from their children,” said Bogucki.

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