Philippines

Back in the 1980s, Davao City was a largely lawless city on the largely lawless island of Mindanao, known to the wider world mostly for its Muslim and communist insurgencies.

Recently inaugurated Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is "expressing regret" for his comments at a fiery press conference, in which he called President Obama a "son of a bitch" or "son of a whore" (depending on how you translate the Tagalog) and threatened to swear at him in a planned bilateral meeting.

The White House canceled the meeting shortly after Duterte's comments.

"We ... regret [the remarks] came across as a personal attack on the U.S. president," Duterte's office said in a statement issued Tuesday.

An explosion has hit a night market in the hometown of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, killing at least 10 people and injuring many more, according to local officials. The blast hit Davao City on Friday, as Duterte was in town for a visit.

Dozens of people were wounded, according to news reports.

The explosion apparently struck shortly after 10 p.m. local time, and police were working to determine what caused it, though they suspect it was a bomb.

A fisherman in the Philippines might have discovered the largest natural pearl ever found — and then kept it hidden under his bed for 10 years.

The pearl's existence was revealed by Aileen Cynthia Maggay-Amurao, a tourism officer in Puerto Princesa, on the island of Palawan.

She says the fisherman is one of her relatives and that he discovered it in a giant clam and kept it as a good-luck charm.

Editor's Note: The photos in this story may be distressing to some viewers.

Rodrigo Duterte, the new president of the Philippines, campaigned as a tough-on-crime candidate, threatening death for drug dealers.

And in the seven weeks since he took office, nearly 1,800 alleged criminals have died — at the hands of police or under mysterious circumstances. The wave of extrajudicial killings has prompted outcry from human rights watchdogs, the Catholic Church and the United Nations.

Updated 6:10 a.m. ET Tuesday:

With 87 percent of precincts counted, Rodrigo Duterte, the mayor of southern Davao City, appears to have clinched the Philippines presidential election. Michael Sullivan reports for our Newscast Unit that Duterte, who began as a political outsider, "collected nearly twice as many votes as his two main rivals, including the man supported by outgoing President Benigno Aquino."

Results are still not official, but his two closest rivals have withdrawn from the race in the face of Duterte's commanding lead, Reuters reports.

The dispute over the South China Sea, one of the most complicated geopolitical issues of the 21st century, keeps heating up. China, Taiwan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam and other regional governments are all part of the dispute — along with the United States.

Here are four key things to know about the dispute.

1. What's At Stake

The South China Sea holds immense resources, from the oil and gas located underneath the seabed to the lucrative fishing it has afforded for generations.

Bullit Marquez / Associated Press

Local Filipinos are raising funds for victims of two recent natural disasters in the Philippines.

The Filipino Community of Seattle had planned a dinner benefit on Nov. 22 to help the victims of a devastating earthquake that rocked the country last month. Then Typhoon Haiyan slammed into the country on Nov. 8, killing an estimated 10,000 people.