Other News

Interesting news stories from around the Pacific Northwest.

used with permission of Jason Padgett / struckbygenius.com

Sound Effect's Gabriel Spitzer talks with Tacoma resident Jason Padgett about the night he was mugged outside a Tacoma karaoke bar, and how that incident changed the trajectory of his life.

Padgett suffered a concussion in the attack, as well as internal injuries. He also developed post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder.

Courtesy of Autumn Rusch

Autumn Rusch was born with holes in her heart – so many, that her cardiologist described it as looking like it had been shot with a BB gun. As she grew up, her condition worsened. She was hospitalized for weeks on end, and her heart would at times reach an unimaginable 300 beats per minute. At the age of 14, she was given a new heart that would prove a great match. She recently celebrated her 20-year anniversary with it.

Ashley Gross / KPLU

To live in the Northwest is, to some extent, to roll the dice. If you lived through the 1965 Seattle earthquake, or the Nisqually quake in 2001, or if you just read the New Yorker article about the “really big one” destined to hit our region, you know this well: There are forces under our feet that could just shrug our cities off into the abyss.

The push and pull of continental plates is so huge compared with a puny little human. And yet, for a man named Kelcy Allen, the act of a child shielded him from the seismic forces. He’s spent decades feeling grateful to the boy who died saving his life.

Courtesy of Linda Dahlstron Anderson

Linda Dahlstrom decided she wouldn't take her husband Michael’s last name when they married. “Mrs. Michael Anderson” ​seemed like a fictional character to her: well groomed, a good cook, ​the classic ​June Cleaver. Dahlstrom did not feel like June Cleaver.  In fact, she felt like the same person she was before she was married. So she decided to keep things as they were. 

In 2008, Dana Walrath asked her mother Alice to move in with her. Alice's Alzheimer's disease had gotten worse, and even though she still had all her humor and graces, she could no longer take care of herself.

During the next two and-a-half years, Walrath and her mother connected through stories and memories, even though Alice didn't always recognize her daughter. Walrath, a medical anthropologist at the Vermont College of Medicine, in Burlington, Vt., looks back fondly on that time.

KNKX file photo

Adjunct faculty at Seattle University have voted to unionize. Faculty members cast their ballots two years ago, but counting them had been on hold while the Jesuit university appealed to the National Labor Relations Board, seeking an exemption from the labor board’s jurisdiction on religious grounds.

A panel of the NLRB decided this summer that the votes should be counted. That happened Friday, and the result was 73-63, in favor of representation from the Service Employees International Union.

Even if you've never heard of the "coffee cabinet," chances are you've probably tasted something like it. And you might have called it something else, like a coffee milkshake.

The ice cream beverage with the quirky name is a Rhode Island staple, dating back to the World War II era. Its ingredient list is pretty simple: It's just coffee syrup, ice cream and milk. But despite its popularity, the origins of the drink – and its name – remain a mystery.

At one end of Orlando's Fashion Square mall, between a karate store and a comic book emporium, is a clothing boutique called Verona. It's stocked with long-sleeved caftans, full-length slit-less skirts, and more than 300 varieties of hijabs. Inside, women peruse through racks of garments they once could only find online.

Making Amends: Sound Effect, Episode 79

Sep 3, 2016
Jennifer Wing / KNKX

This week on Sound Effect, we learn to make amends. We bring you stories of people making amends after a life of crime, siblings making amends before death, and public officials making amends to an entire city.

The Apology Bell

Courtesy of Rose Bosacker

At hospice centers throughout the Northwest, there’s a simple message written on posters and plaques and displayed throughout the halls. It says “Please forgive me,” “I forgive you,” “Thank you,” and “I love you” It’s the four things you’re supposed to express at the end of your life to find peace of mind before you die.

Anthony Curcio and his wife Emily met in sixth grade in Monroe, Washington. Emily remembers a young Anthony as good and kind. But in college, after a sports injury, Anthony became addicted to opiates and everything changed.

As Anthony’s addiction intensified, so did his criminal ambitions. He did shady realty deals, stole from foreclosed homes, anything to make an easy buck. All the time, Anthony was living a double life with Emily. For nearly a decade, he lied to her. Meanwhile, they got married and had two daughters.

Steve Kaiser / Wikimedia

Sometimes it can take a long time to come around to an apology or to even realize you did something wrong in the first place. In this next story, it took years.

It began on one fateful night in Seattle in the fall of 1999. As protesters squared off against the police during the controversial WTO conference, law enforcement chose to deploy tear gas and aggressive policing tactics.

Courtesy of Natasha Marin

Natasha Marin would like white people to know that because of the color of their skin, they have an inherent advantage, or privilege.

 

“Privilege is complicated," says Marin. "A lot of people hear the word 'privilege' and they think about luxury. Privilege is not about luxury. Especially in terms of white privilege, it’s about benefits and boosts that society affords to you because of your appearance.”

 

The StoryCorps' Military Voices Initiative records stories from members of the U.S. military who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. This week we hear from Jenna Henderson whose husband died while serving in Afghanistan.

Sgt. First Class Chris Henderson joined the Army right out of high school in 1991. He served in Bosnia and Kosovo before deploying to Afghanistan in 2007 as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. On that tour, he was killed by an IED, when he was just 35 years old.

Thursday night in an appearance on MSNBC, Donald Trump surrogate Marco Gutierrez warned of impending taco overlords if immigration continues unchecked.

Gutierrez, who was born in Mexico and is co-founder of Latinos for Trump, said to MSNBC, "My culture is a very dominant culture. It is imposing and it's causing problems."

Then he said the line that started a hashtag: "If you don't do something about it, you're going to have taco trucks [on] every corner."

Over 18,000 contributing listeners to the Save KPLU campaign secure an independent community owned station.

(Tacoma-Seattle, WA) -- Friends of 88.5 FM, a nonprofit community organization formed to preserve local National Public Radio affiliate KPLU, announced the official and final closing of the sale of KPLU. The new, community-owned station is 88.5 knkx. 

A holiday celebrating a dish beloved of many West Africans, World Jollof Day, was marked last week.

Jollof is a celebration dish. You eat it at parties, naming ceremonies, weddings, funerals — you name it, you will see the familiar and comforting pot of steaming jollof rice.

But jollof is also war – of the deliciously friendly variety.

Life, Death And Remembering Those Bright College Years

Aug 28, 2016

Recently I attended my wife's 25th college reunion. Many aspects of the weekend were what you'd expect: reconnecting with her roommates and friends, catching up on their lives and careers, and (mild) revelry late into the night.

As a spouse tagging along, I was braced for a nightmare of never-ending tales of yesteryear in which I'd played no part (my wife and I met after college) and reprisals of long-ago inside jokes.

Ken Bosma/Flickr

This week on Sound Effect, we dream big. We bring you stories from people who dared to dream, and take a look at their successes, failures, and their respective roads ahead.

Charlie And The Rays

We meet the musicians of a local band that just released their first record. While some members of the band are too young to patronize the establishments they perform in, that hasn't stopped them from having big hopes for the future.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

 

 

The founding members of the folk-indie rock band, Charlie and the Rays, are just getting started pursuing their dream. They hope for the day when they’re able to quit their jobs in the service industry and earn a living playing music.

 

But, when you press them a bit more, their hopes for the future are actually quite big.

 

“I want to be a rock star, and just being able to express myself in music.” said 19-year-old Rebecca Stobbee, one of the band’s vocalists.

City of Soap Lake

 

Soap Lake, in Central Washington, is a small town with a really big dream. It’s home to about 1,600 people, and its economy has seen better days. A lot of small towns in that situation might respond by trying to lure a big-box store or coming up with a snappy tourist slogan. But those ambitions are far too puny for Soap Lake.

 

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

For a long time, Melissa Rice's big dream was dance. She wanted to be a ballerina ever since she saw "The Nutcracker" at four years old. In high school, she danced three hours a day at the Pacific Northwest Ballet.

“And it got to the point where my friends who were continuing on seriously were stopping their high school studies so they could dance full time," Rice says.

However, as Rice was deciding whether she wanted to drop out of high school and take her dancing to the next level, she took an astronomy class.

How A 58-Cent Bargain-Bin Sweater Became These Pickers' Crown Jewel

Aug 27, 2016
Heritage Auction

Sean and Ricki McEvoy are professional pickers. They run an online shop called Roselyn VTG Trading Co. and they stock their inventory by scouring thrift stores all over the country looking for vintage clothing to resell.

Courtesy of Richard Berger

 

In 1968, Richard Berger was in his 20s and in medical school in Philadelphia.  It was his lifelong calling to help people — to be a doctor. But, even though he was an honor student, medical school just wasn’t what he thought it would be.

 

“What I found was a lot of authoritarian behaviors and rote memorization. I went, ‘This is so not what I envisioned.’ Here I was with this dream of what my life is going to be about and it’s like crashing into a wall at 100 miles an hour,” Berger said, thinking back to that time.

Allie Ferguson / KPLU

Tacoma arborist Mik Miazio loves trees. He has loved them since he was a kid growing up in New Jersey.

"I remember climbing my first tree when I was a kid. As soon as I was able to, I would jump right in there and disappear. I’m in my own world right there," Miazio said.

It was this love that led Miazio to discover the tallest tree in Tacoma's Point Defiance Park. He noticed the giant Douglas Fir poking out of the canopy when he moved to Tacoma three years ago.

There was perhaps no movie more buzzed-about coming out of the Sundance Film Festival in January than Nate Parker's directorial debut, The Birth of A Nation, a retelling of Nat Turner's 19th century rebellion of enslaved people in Virginia.

If you want a peek into the history of drugstores, there's the History of Pharmacy Museum at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, in Tucson, Ariz.

A hand-carved wood prescription counter helps recreate the look of a small-town pharmacy in the 1800s. And some of the old-timey medicines give you a sense of what the place must have smelled like.

Ah, rum, with its legendary pirates bellowing for grog, tiki umbrellas peeking up from neon-colored cocktails, tequila-spiked punch at college parties. Rum, universally imbibed and yet often scorned. Most rum is "the distilled essence of industrial waste," in the words of Wayne Curtis, author of And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in Ten Cocktails. That waste is molasses, the byproduct of sugar production.

Everybody eats, which is what makes food a perfect choice to resolve conflicts and foster connections among nations. The concept is called "gastrodiplomacy," and South Korea is one of its strongest champions.

The country is one of the world's best at branding itself through food, using its cuisine as a kind of "soft power" to help spread South Korea's influence. And even as the government supports its citizens in opening Korean restaurants around the world, it pays special attention to promoting that most ubiquitous of Korean foods: kimchi.

"Navigation (compas regle)" by mikou07kougou is licensed by CC BY 2.0 bit.ly/2b7cG2c

This week on Sound Effect, we get lost. We bring you stories from people told to move on and from folks who are actually disorientated.

Goodbye, Gabe

We say, "See you later" to Sound Effect's Gabriel Spitzer, who is heading down to California for a year-long journalism fellowship. KPLU's Jennifer Wing will take the reins as Sound Effect's interim host while Gabe is away.

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