A Look Into The 'Infinity Mirrors' At The Seattle Art Museum

Jun 30, 2017

Seattle was the first American city to host Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s work in 1957.

Now, more than six decades worth of Kusama’s work is at the Seattle Art Museum after a stint at Washington D.C.’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

“It’s so meaningful to think that Seattle was there for Kusama’s very first solo show abroad,” said Catharina Manchanda, modern and contemporary art curator at the museum. “Today, people can look at this incredible career that she’s had since, and now she’s age 88 and you can take it all in.”

The exhibition features paintings, sculptures as well as various mirrored rooms where hanging lights and sculptures reflect off the walls, allowing the viewer to feel like they are floating through the cosmos. Kusama’s “Obliteration Room” is a blank canvas disguised as a modern living room and lets museum goers interact with the artwork by placing polka dot stickers wherever they like.

The “Infinity Mirrors” exhibit runs until Sept. 10. Advance tickets for the entire run through September sold out in one day. But if you have a flexible schedule, the museum is opening up room for a limited number of day-of tickets that can be purchased at the door when the museum opens at 10 a.m. 

Infinity Mirrored Room–Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity

Credit Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Infinity Mirror Room–Phalli’s Field

Infinity Mirror Room–Phalli’s Field
Credit Parker Miles Blohm

Dots Obsession–Love Transformed into Dots

Dots Obsession–Love Transformed into Dots
Credit Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX