Colin Dwyer

Author of the monumental multivolume novel In Search of Lost Time. High modernist of the first order and reclusive titan of French letters. And, if one Canadian scholar is correct, quite the dapper attendee of a wedding in 1904.

In the more than a century since Marcel Proust was first published, the name of the great French novelist has come to be associated with many things, but film footage is not one of them. Despite a handful of photographs depicting Proust, no one living claimed to have seen the man actually move -- until earlier this month.

By a 57-43 margin, the Republican-led Senate voted Wednesday to repeal an Obama-era regulation designed to block certain mentally ill people from purchasing firearms. The vote, which approves a House resolution passed earlier this month, now sends the measure to the White House for President Trump's signature.

There was no end of intrigue at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show this year.

Rumor, the German shepherd who narrowly lost at last year's show, had come close to simply hanging up her leash and retiring. Instead, she stormed back to win her category again this year — and then, to top it all off, beat out more than 2,800 dogs to take Best in Show on Tuesday, as well.

If it seems like it was just yesterday the Northeast had to batten down for a big, blustery snowstorm — well, you're almost right. The shovels are hardly dry from the foot of snow dumped on New York City and Boston late last week.

But, to take some liberty with an old adage, no rest for the wintry.

Snow has already returned to the Northeast, and meteorologists expect that well into Monday, areas from upstate New York to Maine will be buffeted by high winds, sleet and snowfall rates that could get as high as 2 to 4 inches an hour in certain parts of New England.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Al Jarreau, a versatile vocalist who defied categorization for decades, died Sunday morning at the age of 76. Earlier this week, Jarreau had been hospitalized in Los Angeles "due to exhaustion," according to his official Facebook page.

It has been a week of heartbreak on New Zealand's Farewell Spit, with an unexpectedly happy twist.

In two separate mass strandings, more than 650 pilot whales beached themselves on the thin strip of land — and over 350 of those died there over the past few days. When volunteer rescuers left the beach for the night Saturday, hundreds of survivors from the second stranding remained ashore.

After an unexploded World War II-era bomb was discovered buried next to a gas station in Thessaloniki, authorities in Greece's second-largest city had to figure out how to get it out of there.

They determined that tens of thousands of people would have to be removed from their homes as well.

By Sunday morning, all could breathe a sigh of relief.

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET Sunday

Anti-abortion rights protesters gathered outside Planned Parenthood clinics across the country Saturday, in a series of rallies calling on politicians to end federal funding for the century-old organization. The activists planned to picket outside roughly 200 Planned Parenthood clinics — but at many of those locations, counterprotesters were there to meet them.

If you just so happened to crane your neck skyward at night this week — or better yet, if you craned your neck downward to look in your telescope — you probably caught quite a show.

The night sky has been busy lately: A full moon, known by the Farmer's Almanac as a "Snow Moon" since it happened in February, took center stage on Friday night.

Nevertheless, it still got over shadowed by Earth — literally, as a matter of fact. For several hours in the early evening ET, the outer edge of Earth's shadow darkened the face of the moon for observers in most of the world.

The day began with grim resolve, as volunteers descended upon a remote New Zealand beach to try to send some 100 beached pilot whales back to sea. By mid-afternoon local time, most of those whales — the survivors of country's third-largest stranding on record — had successfully swum back into Golden Bay.

It could have been a happy ending to a story that began tragically, with some 300 whales found dead after more than 400 stranded earlier in the week on Farewell Spit, a thin strip of beach that arcs like a bent finger into the waters north of New Zealand's South Island.

Updated at 7:40 a.m. ET

By the time Ceree Morrison found hundreds of pilot whales washed ashore on a remote beach in New Zealand 250 to 300 of them were already dead. The rest remained alive on Farewell Spit, a long strip of land that hooks from the country's South Island into the sea.

The scene was devastating.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

At a joint news conference Friday, President Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe sought to shed any perceptions of mistrust between two countries that have been longtime allies. In no uncertain terms, both leaders upheld their friendly relations — both diplomatic and personal — as an alliance with a bright future.

As a rule, it's considered less than desirable to have a long-unexploded bomb buried deep in the ground near your property. Even less so when that property is a gas station.

Yet that's precisely what residents in Thessaloniki, the second-largest city in Greece, discovered last week. And it's precisely why some 72,000 of them are scheduled to be evacuated from the city Sunday, as authorities seek to defuse and extricate the World War II-era weapon.

Just when you thought it was safe to go back into the condiment aisle, a British supermarket chain has reignited the ketchup wars.

To be clear, ASDA did not start the great debate over whether to keep an opened bottle of ketchup in the refrigerator or at room temperature. But the grocery store has callously dared to goad a long-simmering argument into a full-on cold war.

Sure, the dictionary's a resource designed to give an accurate accounting of words in all their many shapes and sizes, their definitions and their spellings. But whatever finality a dictionary's thick binding implies, it's destined to beg adjustment just as soon as it has been set, as words take shape, wither from disuse or simply fall in and out of favor.

After three quarters, this game looked for all the world like a rout by the Atlanta Falcons. They were up 28-9. Their quarterback Matt Ryan, who just won the regular season MVP on Saturday night, was playing like an unstoppable Super Bowl MVP, too.

Then, something unbelievable happened: The New England Patriots came back.

In case you haven't heard, a few dozen guys are planning to play a football game in Houston on Sunday. It's kind of a big deal.

Updated at 4:13 a.m. ET Sunday

President Trump's travel ban remains suspended, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied a Justice Department request to stay the suspension of President Trump's order.

The court asked opponents of the ban to respond to the Trump administration's appeal by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. PT; the court asked the Justice Department to respond by Monday at 3 p.m. PT.

Here's an abridged list of phrases you might not expect to be spoken in anguish by a chess play-by-play announcer:

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

The U.S. added 227,000 jobs in January and the unemployment rate rose just slightly, ticking up a tenth of a percentage point to 4.8 percent, according to the monthly report released Friday by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The robust jobs number beat most predictions from economists, who had pegged the payroll increase at 175,000, according to NPR's Yuki Noguchi.

Aggrieved at what they perceive as acquiescence to President Trump's agenda, liberal demonstrators have begun taking a page out of a doctor's playbook: They are making house calls.

Last month, the British Supreme Court dealt Prime Minister Theresa May a small setback in the U.K.'s relentless march toward Brexit, ruling that she would need to seek Parliament's approval before triggering a formal divorce from the European Union.

On Wednesday, Parliament set that march back on course.

As concerns over player safety mount, the national governing body for youth and high school football is considering a version of the game that could look radically different from what football fans might expect.

It's a leaner, less contact-inclined game, focused on fostering well-rounded athletes and cutting down on the kinds of bone-rattling, open-field hits that can leave parents cringing in the bleachers.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

They began Saturday as a series of pop-up demonstrations outside several major airports. But by Sunday, the protests against President Trump's temporary immigration freeze had leapt from those airports to squares and plazas in cities across the U.S.

Outside the White House, in Boston's Copley Square and Battery Park in New York City, immigrant advocacy groups have organized protests to register their discontent with the executive order Trump signed Friday.

Updated at 1:38 p.m. ET

A raid in Yemen ended in the death of an American service member and left three others wounded on Saturday. U.S. Central Command announced Sunday that the casualties were sustained in an operation against al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of one of our elite servicemembers," Commander of U.S. Central Command Gen. Joseph Votel said in a statement. "The sacrifices are very profound in our fight against terrorists who threaten innocent peoples across the globe."

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

It has been a day thick with phone calls for President Trump. By the end of the day, the president will have spoken over the phone with the leaders of five countries, including Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET Sunday

Federal Judge Ann Donnelly in Brooklyn, N.Y. granted a request by the American Civil Liberties Union and issued a stay late Saturday on the deportations of valid visa holders after they have landed at a U.S. airport. The ruling by Donnelly temporarily blocks President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration signed Friday.

According to NPR's Hansi Lo Wang:

When we asked listeners to write advertisements for the small joys in life, the stuff and experiences money can't buy, we weren't surprised to find a few things come up often in the sales pitches. Sunsets, breezes, stars and granddaughters — we're with you on those, dear listeners.

Funny enough, though, something else kept coming up: math. There were ads for arithmetic, graph theory, the unending wonders of pi ... what was going on here?

King George III isn't exactly a hero of history.

In most U.S. textbooks, he is portrayed as the British tyrant who lost the Colonies in the American Revolution. He's scarcely more popular in his native U.K., where his bouts with mental illness late in life earned him the impolite epithet "Mad King." And lately, on stage in Hamilton, George's alleged villainy is played for laughs.

But starting Saturday, the much-maligned monarch may get a second chance.

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