Brian Bull

Brian Bull joined the KLCC News Team in June 2016.  He is a 20-year reporter who has worked at NPR, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, Wisconsin Public Radio, and ideastream in Cleveland. His reporting has netted dozens of accolades, including three Edward R. Murrow Awards and the Ohio Associated Press' Best Reporter Award in 2012.

An enrolled member of the Nez Perce Tribe, Bull has worked with NPR's NextGeneration project geared towards diversifying the ranks of tomorrow's journalists, and has been a guest faculty at the Poynter Institute on covering underrepresented communities.

He's glad to be home in the Pacific Northwest, close to his family, tribe, and the Oregon Coast. He's married and has three children, and five cats. He enjoys hiking, cooking, the visual and performing arts, and the occasional Godzilla movie.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

Efforts to end Native American mascots – or keep them, with local tribes’ approval – have left 16 Oregon school districts until July 1 to act. 

Recently, Rogue River High School in Grants Pass worked out a deal with the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians.  They can remain the “Chieftains,” if they incorporate more tribal history in its fourth and eighth grade curricula.

Cindy Hunt of the Oregon Department of Education says 12 districts have either had mascots approved, are pending approval, or have dropped or changed them. 

Efforts to end Native American mascots – or keep them, with local tribes’ approval – have left 16 Oregon school districts until July 1st to act.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

STILL FROM YOUTUBE VIDEO / ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION

An Oregon man is this year’s world elk calling champion. It’s a distinct talent that apparently runs in the family.

The World Elk Calling Championship was in Salt Lake City this month, drawing dozens of people who took their turn before the judges.

The winner of the Professional Division was Bryan Langley of McMinnville. He describes his winning bugle.

“I just went to Walmart and bought a Wiffle Ball bat, cut the ends off of it and put a fleece cover over it.”

The first catch of the 2017 Oregon Dungeness crab season has arrived in Eugene.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it’s a welcome sight for seafood proprietors and customers alike.

If you're wandering the beaches this winter, there's something else to watch for besides incoming tides: sea turtles.