Associated Press

Stephen Brashear / AP Photo

The 20-year-old suspect in the deadly Washington state mall shooting said nothing and appeared "zombie-like" when he was arrested by authorities nearly 24 hours into an intense manhunt, authorities said.

Island County Sheriff's Lt. Mike Hawley said he spotted Arcan Cetin from a patrol car Saturday evening in Oak Harbor, Washington, and immediately recognized him as the suspect who killed five people at the Cascade Mall in nearby Burlington.

Police Hunt Man Who Fatally Shot 5 At Mall North Of Seattle

Sep 23, 2016

A gunman police said killed five people in a Washington state mall remained at large Saturday as authorities appealed for help in identifying the suspect but said there were no indications the slayings north of Seattle were a terrorist act.

People fled, customers hid in dressing rooms and employees locked the doors of nearby stores after gunshots rang out just after 7 p.m. Friday at the Cascade Mall. A helicopter, search teams and K-9 units scoured the area for a rifle-carrying man in a police response that included more than 200 officers.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

State officials say Tim Eyman and his political committees have paid $20,000 in costs connected to delaying an investigation of campaign-finance practices.

In return, the Washington State Attorney General's Office said in a Thursday news release they requested and a judge approved dismissing a contempt proceeding against Eyman.

Ashley Gross / KPLU

The Obama administration says it has won an important victory in a World Trade Organization dispute with the European Union over subsidies to airplane manufacturer Airbus.

The WTO found in June 2011 that the EU provided billions of dollars in subsidized financing to Airbus. The EU subsequently claimed to have come into compliance, but the United States disagreed and requested that a compliance panel intervene.

Jessica Hill / AP Photo


The WNBA playoffs open Wednesday night with a pair of games showcasing the league's revamped playoff format. First up will be the single-elimination games as fifth-seeded Indiana hosts No. 8 Phoenix and seventh-seed Seattle is at No. 6 Atlanta. Sports Commentator Art Thiel says the new "one-and-done" format could actually be a boon for the Seattle Storm.

A federal appeals court panel has rejected a class-action lawsuit brought on behalf of children who go without lawyers in deportation proceedings.

The lawsuit was filed two years ago in Seattle by immigrant rights advocates, following a flood of unaccompanied minors arriving at the U.S. border. It sought to force the government to appoint lawyers for the children.

Daniel X. O'Neil via Creative Commons

The Seattle City Council is scheduled to vote Monday afternoon on new scheduling rules for hourly retail and food-service employees.

The proposed law would require employers to schedule shifts 14 days in advance, pay workers extra for certain last-minute scheduling changes, and provide a minimum 10 hours rest between open and closing shifts, among other provisions.

Elaine Thompson / Associated Press

Breanna Stewart now can add the WNBA's top selling jersey to a year that already includes an NCAA championship and an Olympic gold medal.

The league announced Thursday that Stewart's jersey and merchandise of her Seattle Storm top the WNBA in sales.

Stewart says it shows the support she has received in the WNBA and hopes the league benefits too.

Ted S. Warren / Associated Press

Amazon is starting a site offering research, reviews and other information on new and used cars.

The latest venture by the e-commerce powerhouse will compete with established players in the field including CarSoup.com, Edmunds.com, truecar.com and cars.com.

@JohnSnaza / Twitter

The Thurston County Sheriff's Office in Washington state says Sheriff John Snaza has been critically hurt in a motorcycle crash in Montana.

Lt. Tim Rudloff says in a news release that Snaza suffered life-threatening injuries in the crash, which happened Tuesday at about 6 p.m. in Sanders County, Montana.

Snaza was flown to a hospital in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, where he was listed in critical but stable condition on Wednesday.

Matthew Brown / AP Photo

State officials say BNSF Railway will pay $75,000 to settle a 2015 penalty for water quality violations.

The Department of Ecology said Monday the railway agreed to the fine for placing creosote-treated railroad ties in water during maintenance projects in Whatcom and Skagit counties.

David Zalubowski / AP Photo

Ichiro Suzuki has gotten his 3,000th career hit in the major leagues, becoming the 30th player to reach the milestone.

The Marlins outfielder did it Sunday with a triple in the seventh inning against Colorado at Coors Field. Miami players came out of the dugout to congratulate Suzuki, and he waved his helmet to acknowledge the cheers.

University of Washington

The University of Washington says a microbiology professor faces possible discipline for violating sexual harassment policies.

As detailed in a report on BuzzFeed this week, university investigations found Dr. Michael Katze demanded and received sexual favors from an employee in his lab. Investigators found that the woman, who had little prior job experience and performed little work in the office, was paid 12 percent more than the university's average for her position, and received gifts and vacations from the professor.

Ed Ronco / KPLU

Seattle police are working with the FBI to investigate an attack on a transgender man who was beaten after leaving a fundraiser for victims of the Orlando mass shooting.

The Wednesday night attack happened in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood just before midnight.

According to the police department's online blotter, the attacker said, "Hey, Happy Pride" before punching the man in the face. The victim was left unconscious after being grabbed by the throat and assaulted further.

EMILY SCHWING / NORTHWEST NEWS NETWORK

Washington and Oregon environmental regulators said Tuesday that regional coordination and planning exercises such as drills aided their response to the fiery train derailment along the Columbia River earlier this month.

The Northwest officials briefed their counterparts from other states on the June 3 train accident in Mosier, Oregon, at the annual meeting of the Pacific States/British Columbia Oil Spill Task Force.

Green River College

The president of Green River College is stepping down after six years on the job, effective immediately. No reason has been given for Eileen Ely's resignation, although union faculty have been calling for her to step down for years. They went on strike in May over proposed program cuts.

Felipe Dana / AP Photo

The first case of the Zika virus has been reported in King County. It's the third case of Zika in Washington state. Officials are not concerned about an outbreak in the Pacific Northwest, but more cases are expected.

The King County case involved a man in his forties who recently traveled to the country of Colombia. That's one of the countries where Zika is actively spreading, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Bellamy Pailthorp / KPLU

The Pacific Fisheries Management Council has adopted limited summer salmon fishing seasons off the Washington and northern Oregon coasts. At a meeting on Thursday in Vancouver, the council avoided a complete closure of the season, a possibility that had been discussed in March.

Nancy Heaslip / New York Department of Environmental Conservation

White-nose syndrome has killed more than 6 million bats in 28 states and five Canadian provinces since it was first documented nearly a decade ago in New York. Now, Washington state has become the most recent addition to that list, after hikers found a bat with the disease on a trail in North Bend, about 30 miles east of Seattle.

The U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center verified the disease in a little brown bat found on March 11.  It died two days later.

Elaine Thompson / AP Images

Bernie Sanders has won Washington's Democratic presidential caucuses after tens of thousands of people met at schools, libraries and community centers across the state.

There are 118 delegates at stake in Washington, with 101 to ultimately be awarded proportionally based on the results of Saturday's caucuses. The remaining 17 are technically unpledged party and elected leaders, though a majority of them — including Gov. Jay Inslee and the state's Congressional delegation — have already said they support frontrunner Hillary Clinton.

The Seattle Archdiocese says it will pay just over $9 million to eight women who were sexually abused as children by a former priest in Whatcom and Skagit counties.

The archdiocese said in a news release Wednesday that Michael Cody abused the girls between 1968 and 1974 at churches in Burlington, La Conner, Swinomish and Bellingham.

Archbishop J. Peter Sartain said in the statement he deeply regrets the abuse by Cody.

The archdiocese agreed in May 2015 to pay $1.2 million to settle a lawsuit brought by a Sedro-Woolley woman who said she was molested by Cody.

Marco Ugarte / AP Photo

Nestora Salgado, of Renton, Washington, who was held in a prison in Mexico for two and a half years, was released this morning from Tepepan prison in Mexico City. Human rights activists in Mexico and the United States had been pressuring the Mexican government to free her.

Elaine Thompson / AP

Police have arrested three teenagers in connection with the shooting at a Seattle homeless encampment last week that left 2 people dead and three others wounded.

Seattle police say the suspects, ages 13, 16 and 17, were arrested Monday afternoon in Seattle. No further information about the arrests was immediately available.

(Tessica Truang is on the right. Kathleen Yang is on the left.)
Bellamy Pailthorp / KPLU

Opposition to the proposed expansion of a pipeline in Canada took center stage Friday in British Columbia.

Canada’s National Energy Board heard testimony from several parties, including a Seattle lawyer representing four Washington state tribes. None of the parties scheduled to go before the board on Friday morning were in favor of the project.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

After spending years debating possible ways out of the quagmire of state education funding, lawmakers from both parties and both houses announced Friday they may have a plan to fix the way the state pays for education.

Four years after the Supreme Court ruled the way the state pays for education is unconstitutional, the Washington Legislature is still debating how to finish responding to the court. They are working under a contempt order and a daily $100,000 fine until they do.

Elaine Thompson / AP

Ken Griffey Jr. has been elected to the baseball Hall of Fame with the highest voting percentage ever, and Mike Piazza also is headed to Cooperstown.

Jeff Bagwell and Tim Raines fell short in results announced Wednesday.

A star slugger of the Steroids Era never tainted by accusations of drug use, Griffey was on 437 of 440 votes in his first appearance on the Baseball Writers' Association of America ballot. His 99.3 percentage topped Tom Seaver's 98.84 in 1992.

Elaine Thompson / AP

Longtime Democratic Rep. Jim McDermott of Washington state is retiring.

He announced Monday he won't seek a 15th term. McDermott was first elected in 1988 and is the longest-serving member of the state's congressional delegation.

The 78-year-old is a former Navy psychiatrist known for his liberal views and criticism of the Iraq war. He is a senior member of the tax-policy-writing House Ways and Means Committee.

Elaine Thompson / AP

More than 3,000 prisoners in Washington have been mistakenly released early since 2002 because of an error by the state's Department of Corrections.

 

At a news conference Tuesday, Gov. Jay Inslee said he had ordered immediate steps to correct the long-standing problem.

Paula Wissel / KPLU

A suspended Western Washington University student has pleaded not guilty to hate crime charges.

19-year-old Tysen Campbell appeared in Whatcom County Superior Court Friday after being charged with malicious harassment, under Washington's hate crime law, for allegedly writing "let's lynch her" on a social media post concerning a student leader at Western Washington University.

Elaine Thompson / AP

Washington voters passed a ballot measure that would outlaw sales of items ranging from lion skins to elephant ivory.

The first batch of election results Tuesday night showed Initiative 1401 with an overwhelming lead in early returns across the state. The measure would ban the purchase, sale and distribution of parts or products made from 10 endangered animals. They include lions, elephants, rhinos, tigers, leopards, cheetahs, marine turtles, pangolins, sharks and rays.

Offenders could face a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $10,000 fine.

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