West Point Treatment Plant

Ned Ahrens / King County Wastewater Treatment Division

SEATTLE (AP) — Officials say the state's largest sewage treatment plant is back in compliance with its environmental permits.

The Seattle Times reports Wednesday was the first 24-hour sampling period of the West Point Treatment plant's discharge to Puget Sound that showed full compliance with its state and federal environmental permits.

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

The King County Council has formally launched an investigation into what caused the catastrophic failure of its largest wastewater treatment facility in early February.

 

During the failure, about 30 million gallons of raw sewage flowed into Puget Sound. At 2 a.m. on February 9, catastrophic flooding shut down the West Point Treatment Plant in Seattle’s Magnolia neighborhood.

 

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Temporary fans and sump-pump hoses are whirring along inside the West Point Treatment plant. It’s still dark inside the tunnels where on February 9, a flood of sewage busted doors off and submerged everything up to 12-feet high.

Where we’re standing, we would have been underwater.  Plant manager Robert Waddle switches on a flashlight to show me around.

Ned Ahrens / King County Wastewater Treatment Division

The breakdown last month of Seattle’s wastewater treatment plant has poured hundreds of millions of gallons of untreated stormwater and raw sewage into Puget Sound. Repairs alone will cost an estimated $25 million. And it’s expected to take till the end of April to get the West Point Treatment Plant back to normal. Until then, the broken wastewater facility will be violating its permit and polluting Puget Sound.

COURTESY OF KING COUNTY WASTEWATER DIVISION

What caused the catastrophic failure of Seattle’s main wastewater treatment plant and how can the public be sure it won’t happen again?

King County Council members took emergency action Monday to ensure there’s a fully independent investigation.  

More Than Stormy Weather

COURTESY OF KING COUNTY WASTEWATER DIVISION

Three weeks after floodwaters crippled a major Seattle sewage treatment plant, a clearer picture of the damage is emerging.

King County's wastewater treatment director, Mark Isaacson, said the flooding that occurred Feb. 9 is unlike anything the West Point Treatment Plant has seen in its 50-year history. 

Courtesy of King County Wastewater Division

King County is working to expedite the cleanup at a wastewater treatment plant that flooded earlier this month in Seattle's Magnolia neighborhood.

The King County Council unanimously approved to extend a waiver on the county's competitive bidding process for contractors.