Spain

Thousands gathered on the streets of Madrid to protest bullfighting, chanting that it is "torture — not art or culture!"

This demonstration comes amid growing momentum in Spain against the centuries-old tradition, as reporter Lauren Frayer tells our Newscast unit. It was organized by Pacma, an animal rights political party — and the group says it was "the biggest anti-bullfighting protest to date," as Reuters reports.

Every day at 2 p.m., Antonio Davila rolls the metal shutters down over the front of his computer repair shop in central Madrid. He heads home for lunch, picks up his kids at school — and then goes back to work from 5 to 9 p.m. He's originally from Peru, and says Spanish hours took some getting used to.

"The sun sets later here, and that affects people's habits," Davila says. "I open my shop around 10:30 a.m., close in the afternoon, and then stay open later at night."

Spain's national police seized 20,000 military uniforms — in a variety of camouflage styles — that the authorities say were headed for ISIS and jihadists in Syria.

Spain's Interior Ministry says the large shipment, which weighed more than 5 tons, was part of a "very active and effective business network" that had sent supplies and war materiel to ISIS.

The uniforms were found in three shipping containers that were intercepted at ports in Valencia and Algeciras.

From Madrid, Lauren Frayer reports for our Newscast unit:

As hundreds of thousands of Arab and African migrants arrive in Europe, Spanish lawmakers meet to discuss the continent's crisis — and all eyes are on one woman. She's the only national politician whose skin is the same color as many of the African migrants crossing the Mediterranean to Spain. But she made a different journey from Africa.

"I was born in Equatorial Guinea when it was a Spanish colony," explains Rita Bosaho, Spain's first black member of parliament. "My parents died when I was very young, and I came to live with a foster family in Spain."

Thousands of small investors who lost some or all of their savings when a large bank in Spain failed in 2012 may now get their money back. Bankia, which needed a $19 billion bailout just one year after its initial public offering, announced the surprise move Wednesday.

For centuries, people have been making a 500-mile pilgrimage across northern Spain known as the "Way of St. James" or El Camino de Santiago, and among them is a growing number of people from the Pacific Northwest.

The pilgrimage was traditionally made for religious reasons. The route ends at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela where the remains of  St. James the Apostle are believed to be buried.

But Portland filmmaker Lydia B. Smith, whose documentary "Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago" is opening in Seattle this weekend, says there are many reasons people take on the challenge.

"A lot of people do it for the adventure or to ease a transition without looking for something specific," she said. "There really is no right or wrong reason to do the Camino."