solar eclipse 2017

Robert F. Bukaty, File / AP Photo

This story was updated at 3:09 p.m. Friday, Aug. 25.  See correction below.

Along with cooling the air and dimming skies in the region, this week’s solar eclipse caused high tides. The resulting currents damaged a net pen and released unknown numbers of farmed Atlantic salmon into open waters south of the San Juan Islands.

The solar eclipse is in the books, but the scientific analysis goes on. Teams of high school and college students scrambled Monday afternoon to locate and recover cameras and experimental payloads they launched to the edge of space during the eclipse.

Paula Wissel / knkx

We weren't in the path of totality, but that didn't dampen the excitement in Seattle and around the Puget Sound region.

Nearly everywhere, people stepped outside their workplaces to look up at the sky and watch as the eclipse obscured 92 percent of the sun.

The Washington State Department of Transportation will activate its emergency operations center on Monday morning in case solar eclipse traffic turns horrible. In Oregon, state and county emergency coordination centers were activated on Thursday.

The eclipse is here.

Up to 1 millions visitors have flocked to Oregon to watch the first total solar eclipse viewable from the contiguous United States in 38 years. 

Courtesy of Romeo Durscher/NASA

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

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Sue Cantan / Flickr

There has been a lot of talk about the solar eclipse and its effect on humans: Traffic will be a nightmare, cell service might be jammed, and you could seriously damage your eyes if you don’t have proper protection.

 

But what kind of effect will the eclipse have on your pets?

 

 

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

If you missed out on getting eclipse glasses, you're not out of luck yet. There are still ways to see Monday's eclipse without them.

A sheet of paper with a small hole poked through it can act as a mini projector, so can an old shoe box or a regular household colander. None of these alternatives require looking directly at the sun either.

Experts say that even during a total eclipse the only safe time to look at the sun without protective eye wear is if you are in the path of totality - when the moon completely covers the face of the sun.

Art James / Courtesy Art James

Cloudy weather and milder temperatures have come back to the Puget Sound region recently.  We’ll have partly cloudy skies, no rain and temperatures in the mid-70s this weekend.

But come Monday, skies will clear over most of the region, just in time for the total eclipse.

In this March 9, 2016 file photo, people wearing protective glasses look up at the sun to watch a solar eclipse in Jakarta, Indonesia.
Dita Alangkara / AP

When there is a solar eclipse, eye doctors do a lot to warn people about the dangers of looking at the sun without proper eye protection.

A million people may flock to Oregon over the coming week to view the total eclipse of the sun. State officials said Tuesday that they're as prepared as they can possibly be. 



On Monday, the moon will completely eclipse the sun, and people all over the U.S. will watch.

For those who have been boning up on eclipse trivia for weeks, congratulations. For everyone else, here are the things you need to know about the phenomenon.

vbloke / Flickr

With less than a week till the much anticipated solar eclipse, some Amazon shoppers are scrambling to find glasses that are certified safe to view the event. The online retailer recently emailed some shoppers to tell them not to use the solar eclipse glasses they purchased on the site from third-party vendors.

With hordes of eclipse chasers expected to pull out their phones to share the memorable experience next week, wireless carriers are deploying temporary mobile cell towers in Oregon and Idaho to boost capacity in the path of the solar eclipse.

Large crowds are expected to flock to Goldendale Observatory State Park to watch the August 21 eclipse. But as visitors look to the skies, they may not realize a renovation of that south central Washington observatory is on hold for very earthly reasons.

This month's total solar eclipse might be the most-studied disappearance of the sun ever, thanks in part to legions of citizen scientists from the Northwest and beyond.





A state of emergency, excessive heat and an extended period of dry weather are unlikely to pair well with an influx of up to 1.5 million visitors in Oregon in two weeks.

On August 21, the moon will block the sun causing a giant shadow in the Northwest. But the day of the much-anticipated total solar eclipse is also the first day of fall semester for Washington State University Cougars.

The final scramble is on to see the total eclipse on Aug. 21 in the Northwest. Most hotels and campgrounds in the path of totality are booked.

But for those willing to do some research, or pay handsomely, there are still eclipse adventures to be had.

Tim Durkan / Tim Durkan Photography

Drizzle and light showers fell in a few places this week, especially in the south end of the Puget Sound region. But for most of the region, including Seattle, rain has been missing for more than a month.

KNKX weather expert Cliff Mass says there’s a good chance the emerald city will break a record with this dry spell.