rideshare

Uber and Lyft are fighting, on the same side, to make sure their drivers remain independent contractors — not employees entitled to benefits. So far, no court has compelled these ride-hailing companies to change that. But out in the free market, they're facing an unexpected battle: a new startup that's prepared to offer drivers full employee status.

Juno is not a scrappy, rinky-dink kind of startup. Its headquarters are in the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, 1 World Trade Center, on the 47th floor. There's a majestic view of the Hudson River.

Ted S. Warren / AP

A top executive from the ride-app company Uber is in Seattle to talk about how the company is helping the region. That comes while the Seattle City Council weighs an unusual ordinance that would allow drivers for Uber, Lyft and taxi companies to unionize.

AP Photo

Ridesharing services like Sidecar, Uber and Lyft have won the first round in a battle to decide how regulate them in Seattle. There will be no cap on the number of drivers using these apps under a new proposed agreement announced by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray.

Ashley Gross

After working on new regulations for about a year, the Seattle City Council on Monday voted unanimously to limit the number of rideshare drivers who can be active at any one time.

Companies like UberX, Lyft and Sidecar will be able to each have 150 drivers active on the dispatch system at a given time. Those so-called "transportation network companies" let drivers use their personal vehicles and connect with passengers via smartphone applications.