protests | KNKX


Ashley Gross / KNKX

Students around the Puget Sound region, from Seattle to Renton to Gig Harbor, poured out of class as part of the national walkout against gun violence.

At Ingraham High School in North Seattle, hundreds of students gathered on the soccer field. They stood in silence to honor the victims of last month’s school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead.

This story has been updated

Students from across the Pacific Northwest joined a nationwide walkout today to protest gun violence and to remember the 17 people killed in February's school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET to reflect growing number of walkouts

Seventeen-year-old Egzona Rexhepi and many of her classmates in Boise, Idaho, will join students at schools and universities across the country as they walk out of their school Wednesday to protest gun violence.

Richard Vogel / AP Photo

Students at schools across the Puget Sound region are planning to walk out Wednesday as part of a nationwide protest to mark the one-month anniversary of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 people dead.

Will James / KNKX

With crowds of more than 100,000 people, last year's Womxn's March On Seattle was dubbed the largest protest march in city history. Organizers hope to do it again this weekend.

One day after deadly unrest roiled Charlottesville, Va., its effects have sent ripples through cities across the United States. Demonstrators from New York City to Seattle organized rallies Sunday to condemn the white nationalist groups that had descended on the Virginia city this weekend.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

Updated 8:48 a.m. Monday Aug. 14 with number of arrests

Seattle police have arrested three men and confiscated weapons as dueling demonstrations converged in downtown Seattle Sunday afternoon.

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

What was billed as a "free speech" rally at the Evergreen State College turned into yet another West Coast showdown between conservative activists and hooded members of the "antifa" or anti-fascist movement.

Several dozen members of the conservative group Patriot Prayer gathered Thursday evening to make a statement against what they view as liberal intolerance on the Olympia campus.

Will James / KNKX

Several dozen right-leaning protestors gathered in front of Seattle City Hall this weekend for what was billed as a rally against traditional Islamic law, or Sharia. 

In this progressive stronghold, they were quickly met by a much larger counter-protest of several hundred people opposing what they saw as forces of intolerance in their city.

The counter-march drew mainstream liberals and Muslims, but also masked and hooded "antifa" activists and self-described anarchists. 

Courtesy of The Evergreen State College


As protests overtook the Evergreen State College last month, students watched their school become a national symbol of campus radicalism.

Videos circulated of students shouting down professors and administrators amidst protests around race and equality. That attention led to threats of violence that shut down the Olympia campus for three days.

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

SEATTLE (AP) — Climate activists opposed to oil pipeline projects are demonstrating at several JPMorgan Chase bank locations in Seattle.

They're calling on the bank not to do business with TransCanada, the company pushing for the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

In the week leading up to May Day, Seattle prepared for the worst. For the past five years, peaceful May Day marches have been overshadowed by violence and property damage.

Those demonstrations unfolded peacefully for the most part this year. In the end, five people were arrested. Two of those people were released and three face charges for assault, resisting arrest and obstructing a police officer.

KNKX spent the day with demonstrators around the city. Here is how May Day unfolded in Seattle.

Preparing For The Worst

Image courtesy of Miles Greb

Seattle’s March for Science is expected to be the second largest one in the country, second only to Washington D.C. That’s according to the activists behind it.  

The event is coinciding with the annual Earth Day celebration, when people who care about the environment traditionally get out there to show their colors.

Will James / KNKX

Seattle police say the city sees about 300 demonstrations every year, but it now seems the rest of the country is following suit.

From the nationwide Women's March to spontaneous demonstrations at airports, more people are reportedly becoming more politically active by going to protests.

The First Amendment grants people the right to gather, but there are limits to that protection. 

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo


Seattle’s calendar is filled with demonstrations and rallies in response to recent actions by the Trump administration.

To the rest of the country, protests in this city are a given. While they might be predictable, they can play an important role in spreading political causes.

Allie Ferguson / KNKX

Cheers erupted from a crowd of protesters at Sea-Tac Airport on Saturday after hearing that a federal judge in New York put a hold on part of President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting immigration.

On Friday, Trump signed an executive order banning legal U.S. residents and visa holders from seven Muslim-majority nations from entering the U.S. for 90 days. It also puts an indefinite hold on a program resettling Syrian refugees.

The judge prohibited the U.S. government from deporting travelers with valid visas covered by the Trump order.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Hundreds showed up Tuesday night for a rally in Seattle’s Westlake Park. They were there to show frustration over President Donald Trump’s executive action giving a green light to the controversial Dakota Access pipeline. Many of the protesters were chanting "We can't drink oil; leave it in the soil."


Reana Anderson was among the hundreds who gathered. She's native Hawaiian and says it's important to her to protect tribal rights and the environment.


Will James / KNKX

Saturday's women’s march drew more than 100,000 people into the streets of Seattle, just one day after President Donald Trump took office.

But as time goes on, protest movements tend to fade. So knkx reporters Will James and Warren Langford asked marchers how they plan to keep up their momentum — and incorporate their activism into their daily lives — long after the frenetic moment of Trump's inauguration has passed.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

An inauguration protest in Washington, D.C., turned confrontational on Friday, as several hundred black-clad protesters broke windows and police responded with pepper spray and a concussive device.

The interim chief of the Metropolitan Police Department, Peter Newsham, said 217 protesters have been arrested, and 6 officers sustained minor injuries.

This weekend, hundreds of thousands of Americans will be taking to the streets — some to celebrate, some to protest the inauguration and others to demonstrate for issues that the president-elect cares about.

If you happen to be one of those people, you might have this nagging question in the back of your mind: Will any of it make a difference?

After weeks of protests by South African students calling for free tuition, Monday was supposed to be the reopening of regular classes at the University of the Witswatersrand.

But marches by hundreds of protesters showed that a return to normalcy isn't on the schedule at the campus in Johannesburg.

Members of the "Fees Must Fall" movement entered auditoriums, disrupting classes and intimidating other students, Peter Granitz reported on Morning Edition.

Warren Langford / KPLU

Several hundred Black Lives Matter demonstrators gathered in Seattle's Westlake Park Tuesday evening. Signs bearing the names and faces of people of color who were killed by the police in recent years were distributed among the crowd.

With her son at her side, Nichelle Webster joined the march holding a sign that read simply, "Black Lives Matter.”

"I'm here for my son — and all the sons. I’m here for the black community. I'm here because black lives matter,” said Webster. “We need to focus on getting our men, our sons, into a society where they are equal.”