Politics

Political news

One of two candidates to become the U.K.'s next prime minister has withdrawn from the race, leaving Theresa May in line to be the country's next leader.

Andrea Leadsom announced Monday she is backing out of the contest, citing the strong support for her opponent May and saying it was in Britain's best interests for the next leader to be put in place quickly.

When I first heard the news after midnight Thursday that a sniper had killed police officers in Dallas, my first thought was, "Oh, no."

"Oh, no" for the officers and their families, for those trying to peacefully protest recent police shootings. But that "Oh, no" was also for what could come next and a fear for our country, for race relations, for an American people in the midst of a dark presidential campaign that is threatening to tear at the seams of the fabric of our quilted country.

Bernie Sanders is expected to endorse Hillary Clinton on Tuesday at an event in New Hampshire, a Democratic source with knowledge of discussions between the two campaigns tell NPR's Tamara Keith.

Clinton secured enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination just over a month ago, but Sanders has stayed in the campaign — though he kept a lower profile.

For more than four hours Thursday, FBI Director James Comey answered questions from the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

Comey appeared just two days after he announced that while Hillary Clinton was "extremely careless" in handling classified information while she was secretary of state, she should not face charges.

Hillary Clinton spoke in Atlantic City, N.J. Wednesday, calling for more jobs in the city and blasting Donald Trump's business record in the area.

NPR's politics team has annotated Clinton's speech below. Portions we commented on are highlighted, followed by analysis, context and fact check in italics.

The speech follows:

That was really great. Thank you so very much.

Donald Trump is coming to Washington Thursday for meetings with Congressional Republicans. He has a breakfast scheduled with House GOP members and a meeting soon after on Capitol Hill with Senate Republicans. This comes about a week and a half before Trump will formally accept his party's nomination at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

So, why now? Here are three reasons:

The battle to control the Republican National Convention in Cleveland — and the fate of the party — has reached a turning point.

While the "Stop Trump" movement has unleashed a barrage of cross-country phone calls and emails to seek support for its proposals, a group of longtime Republican rule-makers, some working with the Donald Trump campaign, has quickly coalesced to try to block them.

Tuesday was a mixed bag for Hillary Clinton.

She escaped a recommendation of an indictment from the FBI, removing the biggest storm cloud over her in this presidential campaign.

But it did not come without significant pain for Clinton, because while FBI Director James Comey did not recommend a formal indictment to the Department of Justice, he served up an indictment of her judgment.

Donald Trump insists he didn't mean anything anti-Semitic by his weekend tweet depicting Democratic rival Hillary Clinton alongside a six-point star and piles of $100 bills. Assuming that's true, it's yet another unforced error for the Trump campaign, in what's become an almost constant stream of errors, gaffes, and other blunders.

No president has campaigned strongly for his chosen successor in at least 100 years.

Tuesday's event, with President Obama campaigning for Hillary Clinton, his former secretary of state and onetime rival, in North Carolina is remarkable for that reason. It kicks off what is likely to be a season of vigorous campaigning by the president.

Lis Ferla / Flickr

Earlier this year, a crying, naked newborn baby was found in a trash compactor in Everett, about less than half a mile away from a fire station. Now two King County Council Members are pushing for a public information campaign to let people know about the state’s 'Safe Haven' law

Every presidential election manages to feel new somehow. Even amid the wall-to-wall cable coverage and poll frenzies and day-before-the-election, man-on-the-street interviews with still-undecided voters and shock (shock!) when a candidate flip-flops, every four years, there's a sense that this time — this time — is different. (Remember that whole recount thing?)

And then there's 2016.

Email campaign fundraising is tricky. How do you avoid the dreaded spam folder? Should you ask for a lot or a little? Should you sound urgent or casual?

There is definitely a method to the madness of sending out the right email. Candidates painstakingly test every detail of an email ahead of time to determine which is the most effective.

This idea isn't new — it's a move straight from President Obama's 2008 and 2012 campaigns.

It's July, and that means the Republican and Democratic National Conventions are coming very soon. The Republican convention is up first, July 18-21 in Cleveland, but the Donald Trump campaign has yet to release many details of the event.

The presumptive Republican nominee has been saying for weeks that he wants to mix up the program for the convention. He recently promised on Twitter that the convention will be "amazing":

Austria's highest court has overturned the results of the country's presidential election and ordered a re-do, citing vote-counting irregularities.

In the May runoff election, left-leaning, Green Party-backed candidate Alexander Van der Bellen defeated his far-right, anti-immigration rival Norbert Hofer by fewer than 31,000 votes. As we reported, his margin of victory was just 0.6 percent.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Vice President Joe Biden is confident that Bernie Sanders is going to endorse Hillary Clinton and that the Democratic party will unify.

"Oh, I've talked to Bernie, Bernie's going to endorse her, this is going to work out," Biden said in an interview with Rachel Martin, host of NPR's Weekend Edition. "The Democrats are coalescing even before this occurs."

Sanders was asked about Biden's comment in an interview with MSNBC on Thursday evening and said he wasn't quite ready to endorse Clinton.

A strange thing is uniting Democrats and Republicans in Washington: the widespread disapproval of a meeting between Attorney General Loretta Lynch and former President Bill Clinton on an airport tarmac in Arizona.

Boris Johnson, who was widely considered a top candidate for U.K. prime minister once David Cameron steps down, has announced he will not be seeking the position.

The former mayor of London was a vocal proponent of the Brexit, and is a popular political figure — widely referred to as just "Boris."

He, like Cameron, is a member of the U.K.'s Conservative Party, which controls the British Parliament; the party's members will be choosing Cameron's replacement over the course of this summer.

Donald Trump has staked his brand on winning. "We will have so much winning," he has said in this campaign, "if I get elected, that you may get bored with winning."

But can he win the presidential election? In a country that has changed rapidly demographically, Trump's best shot is to drive up turnout among white voters, especially white men. But how likely is that?

Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump traveled to the small city of Monessen, Pa., on Tuesday to speak about the impact of international trade on U.S. manufacturing jobs.

As he has before, Trump launched a full-throated attack on globalization, pinning the blame on politicians he says have allowed the U.S. manufacturing base to get hollowed out.

"We allowed foreign countries to subsidize their goods, devalue their currencies, violate their agreements and cheat in every way imaginable. And our politicians did nothing about it," he told the crowd.

Donald Trump laid out his plan for the economy, criticizing globalization and policies that promote free trade, in a speech in Monessen, Pa., on Tuesday.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech. The portions we commented on are bolded, followed by analysis and fact check in italics. We will update further.

The speech follows:

Donald Trump may have clinched the GOP nomination and commands attention with his unorthodox presidential campaign, but President Obama says Trump's record low favorability ratings show he hasn't won over the hearts and minds of the country just yet.

Hillary Clinton laid out her economic plan on Monday at a rally in Cincinnati. She appeared with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a hero to progressives who has stood up to bank executives and called for lower student debt.

NPR's politics team has annotated Clinton's portion of the speech below. Portions we commented on are in boldface, followed by analysis and fact check in italics.

The speech follows:

Voters go to the polls in five states on Tuesday, where congressional primaries in New York and Colorado in particular could have an important impact on key competitive House and Senate races.

Democrats hope to contest as many as four congressional seats in the Empire State, a place that could prove critical in whether they're able to flip the 30 they need to win back the House.

You can normally find Shawn Sheehan teaching math and special education in Norman, Oklahoma, just south of Oklahoma City. But school's out for the summer and instead, he's knocking on doors.

One-by-one he's asking voters in the state's central Senate District 15 to cast their vote for him. He's running unopposed in today's primary as an Independent, and after the polls close he'll know his Republican opponent.

In the race for president, at the moment, Hillary Clinton has an edge.

A new report released Monday by the minority members of the House Select Committee tasked with investigating the events at a diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, absolves the U.S military and then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton of any blame in attacks that left four Americans dead nearly four years ago.

The findings by the Democrats on the committee conclude that the Department of Defense "could not have done anything differently" on Sept. 11, 2012, that could have saved Ambassador Chris Stevens and three others.

It was April 15, 2009, in the depths of the financial crisis. Elizabeth Warren was backstage at The Daily Show, about to make her national TV debut, but her head was not in the clouds.

It was in the toilet. She was throwing up.

"I had stage fright — gut-wrenching, stomach-turning, bile-filled stage fright," she would later write.

The past month has not been kind to Donald Trump.

He has landed in controversy on everything from how much he (eventually) gave to veterans groups to Trump University (and the judge who he declared biased because of his Mexican heritage) to his response to the Orlando shooting.

Ed Andrieski / AP Photo

Congress has moved a step closer to allowing injured veterans access to in vitro fertilization services after the House of Representatives passed a Veterans Affairs bill that includes a provision aimed at helping injured veterans start families. 

Pages