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With just one weekend to go before Hillary Clinton is expected to accept her party's nomination for president, WikiLeaks on Friday released almost 20,000 emails sent and received by Democratic National Committee staff members from January 2015 to May 2016 – leaving journalists scouring for information potentially damaging to the party.

While many pundits and political observers were quick to praise Hillary Clinton's pick of Tim Kaine as her running mate on Friday, the choice wasn't met with universal acclaim.

One important group — progressives and backers of Clinton's former rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — were not as pleased with the selection of the Virginia senator who has cultivated a reputation of working across the aisle over the course of his political career.

It's not often — if ever — that presidential nominees use footnotes in their acceptance speeches.

But last night, Donald Trump used 282 of them in the written version of his acceptance speech — to bolster what he promised would be a presentation of the "facts plainly and honestly." I was footnote number 145.

Trump told the Republican audience that if they wanted to hear "the corporate spin, the carefully-crafted lies and the media myths" they should go to the Democratic convention.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump took to the stage Thursday night at the final night of the GOP National Convention. He was rallying the crowd behind him as the party looks toward the general election. We’ve been checking in with Washington state delegate Jack Bell throughout this week as part of our election series “From the Floor.”

Donald Trump accepted the Republican nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out America's struggles with crime, terrorism and immigration and how he plans to address them.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech below. Portions we commented on are highlighted, followed by analysis, context and fact check in italics.


Thank you, thank you. Thank you very much.

Friends, delegates and fellow Americans: I humbly and gratefully accept your nomination for the presidency of the United States.

In 1987, the book The Art of the Deal elevated Donald Trump from playboy developer to best-selling author.

From the opening paragraph of Trump's self-portrait as a shrewd and creative dealmaker:

"I don't do it for the money. I've got enough, much more than I'll ever need. I do it to do it. Deals are my art form. Other people paint beautifully on canvas or write wonderful poetry. I like making deals, preferably big deals. That's how I get my kicks."

Ivanka Trump is thought to be one of Donald Trump's most influential advisers, a person who can persuade him to hire or fire someone. She will introduce him Thursday night at the Republican National Convention — perhaps her biggest stage yet.

But in the public eye, she sounds very different from her father. While he is blunt, she is noticeably careful in choosing her words.

European leaders hailed what they called the wisdom of mutual defense on Thursday after Donald Trump raised doubts about his commitment to America's NATO obligations if he's elected president.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Former Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz was one of many speakers Wednesday at the party’s national convention. And he was likely the most controversial one after refusing to endorse GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump. The delegates from Washington state were firmly behind Cruz when they initially arrived in Cleveland, Ohio at the start of this week.

But many, like Jack Bell, are now backing Trump in the interest of party unity. Bell says he was discouraged by the fact that Cruz even went on stage in the first place.

Less than 12 hours after he was booed for not endorsing GOP nominee Donald Trump during his late-night speech before the Republican National Convention, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wasn't backing down.

At an emotional event with the Texas RNC delegation Thursday morning, Cruz defended his decision to withhold his endorsement at a time when Republicans are trying to rally around their nominee ahead of the general election.

Donald Trump's presidential fundraising produced its first strong numbers for a big-budget fall campaign last month, but the financial powerhouse backing Hillary Clinton continued to hold a strong lead.

Team Clinton outraised Team Trump $146.3 million to $81.1 million. Cash-on-hand totals were also lopsided: $139.2 million to $61.4 million. These totals include activity by the candidate committees, national party committees, joint fundraising committees and supporting superPACs.

The mandatory monthly reports were filed last night at the Federal Election Commission.

Members of the delegation from Texas, Sen. Ted Cruz's home state, looked shellshocked in the concourse of the Quicken Loans Arena Wednesday night.

Cruz had just delivered a nighttime speech in which he did not endorse Donald Trump. Instead, he told the Republican National Convention to "vote your conscience." As he walked off the stage, the crowd booed.

After repeatedly denying that elements of a 2008 speech by Michelle Obama were used in Melania Trump's address on the first night of the Republican National Convention, an employee of the Trump Organization took responsibility for the flap on Wednesday.

In a statement issued by the Trump campaign, staff writer Meredith McIver accepted responsibility for the addition of Michelle Obama's words in the speech.

Matt Rourke / AP Images

Donald Trump is now the official Republican presidential nominee. Delegates from every state cast their votes during a floor session Tuesday night at the party’s national convention in Cleveland, Ohio. And as Republican leaders, and Trump, look toward the general election in November, the party’s youngest members were gathered to talk about the future of the GOP, and what they can do in order to reach out to other millennials. Washington state delegate Jack Bell says he went to a youth caucus meeting with about 20 other young Republicans.

It's no secret that Donald Trump is struggling to woo Hispanics voters. He's currently polling worse with Latinos than Mitt Romney in 2012 (In that election, Romney captured just 27 percent of the Hispanic vote.).

But on Wednesday night, the Trump campaign might have a chance to shift its messaging ever-so-slightly when three Hispanic Republicans take center stage during prime time. Two of them, former GOP presidential candidates, are familiar faces from the primary season: Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco (who will deliver a video message).

After a night spent hammering Hillary Clinton, Day 3 of the GOP convention is being billed as a day where party leaders will lay out "the Republican vision for a new century of American leadership and excellence."

A bevy of political heavy hitters — Sens. Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio; Govs. Scott Walker and Rick Scott — will tee up the day's headliner: The Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence.

In choosing Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate, Donald Trump has reassured both establishment republicans and social conservatives — but he has also picked someone who in many ways is his polar opposite.

Pence addresses the Republican National Convention on Wednesday night.

As a conservative talk show host in Indiana, Pence called himself "Rush Limbaugh on decaf."

Delegates from Oregon and Washington officially cast their votes for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump Tuesday at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

Republicans have officially nominated Donald Trump as their presidential nominee, with his home state of New York putting him over the top.

The legal scholar Richard Posner points out in The Little Book Of Plagiarism that The Bard himself was a "formidable plagiarist."

In one celebrated scene in Anthony and Cleopatra, Shakespeare borrows heavily from Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony. That borrowing extends to modern literature and even the visual arts, Posner argues.

Washington Delegate Bell Calls First Day Of RNC 'Incredible'

Jul 19, 2016
Jack Bell

The first day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio was filled with the typical speeches and political hoopla. But there were also moments when the so-called “Never Trump” movement attempted to change the event’s rules as a way to derail Donald Trump’s presumptive nomination.

Some of Washington’s delegates were included in that effort to force a roll call vote, as a way to "unbind" delegates from Trump. The move ultimately failed. Washington state delegate Jack Bell says he was not part of that group's attempt.

Donald Trump's campaign is making no apologies for language in Melania Trump's Monday night convention speech that was near-identical to a similar speech Michelle Obama delivered in 2008.

"From a young age, my parents impressed on me the values that you work hard for what you want in life. That your word is your bond and you do what you say and keep your promise," Trump said in one of the similar passages. "That you treat people with respect."

National security was front and center during the Republican National Convention's first night of programming.

Speaker after speaker bashed President Obama and his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, for the Obama administration's approach to fighting ISIS, immigration policies, and the 2012 attacks on diplomatic compounds in Benghazi, Libya.

Here are the facts and context behind several high-profile claims in Monday's speeches.

After an unconventional and then emotional opening day, the 2016 Republican National Convention will turn to Republican leadership and Donald Trump's children as it makes the case to "Make America Work Again."

Earlier in the day, around 5 p.m. ET, state delegates will formally nominate Trump and Gov. Mike Pence.

As Donald Trump had promised, there were surprises Monday night at the opening of his personally programmed Republican National Convention — and some of them might have surprised even him.

Let's take a quick look at what went right and what did not:

The big hits of the night were former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Melania Trump. Their speeches were polar opposites but each lit up the convention hall. Yet each was marred as well.

Chaos erupted on the floor on the first day of the Republican National Committee in Cleveland, as forces opposed to Donald Trump tried — and failed — to make one last stand.

Arkansas Rep. Steve Womack brought up the Rules Committee report, which would keep delegates bound to Trump. Anti-Trump forces began shouting and wanting a roll call vote in a last-ditch effort to unbind GOP delegates and let them vote their "conscience."

This past month has seen lots of news events with potential consequences to politics — controversial police shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge, La., followed by the killing of police officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge. Plus, there was the horrific incident in Nice, France, that saw scores killed when a man drove a truck through a crowd watching fireworks on Bastille Day.

Organizers of this week's Republican National Convention unveiled their program and theme late Sunday, on the eve of the gathering's first session. The theme — "Make America Great Again" — will surprise no one who has heard of Donald Trump and been sentient in the year 2016.

Many people may not even realize that conventions have themes, as most are forgotten soon after the last balloon has fallen. But as the Trump convention gets underway, it's worth a moment of reflection on the theme of the last Republican nominating extravaganza.

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