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At the Democratic National Convention this week, Bill Clinton gave a shout-out to a program called Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youth. In HIPPY, as it's called, parents receive free books, educational materials and weekly home visits to coach them on how to get their young children ready for school.

"Twenty years of research has shown how well this program works to improve readiness for school and academic achievement. There are a lot of young adults in America ... who are enjoying better lives because they were in that program," Clinton said.

On Tuesday as Hillary Clinton's was officially nominated as the first major party female presidential nominee, women (and yes, some men) all over the Wells Fargo Arena in Philadelphia danced, cried, embraced and howled with joy.

The Democratic National Convention erupted into a deafening celebration over a woman being thisclose to the presidency, 240 years after the U.S. was founded and nearly 100 years after women got the right to vote.

Washington’s state treasurer is a low-profile job with high stakes. It involves managing billions of dollars and guarding the state’s creditworthiness. The treasurer is responsible for selling billions of dollars of bonds to major institutional investors.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out her plan to address terrorist threats and create jobs.

California Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, has been in politics since the 1960s, and launched multiple runs for president himself.

In 1992, he ran as the outsider candidate — chastising the incumbent parties that had "failed their duty."

"They've placed their own interest about the national interest," he said during the speech that kicked off his campaign. They've allowed themselves to be trapped and in some cases corrupted by the powerful forces of greed. It's time for them go!"

Susan Walsh / AP Photo

On Wednesday night of the Democratic National Convention, some political heavyweights took the stage to pledge their support for the presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton. There were speeches from former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine and President Barack Obama. Each of them explained how they think Clinton is uniquely qualified to be the next commander in chief.

Washington state delegate Trang Nguyen was in the audience again, listening. Nguyen says she thought Kaine's speech resonated well with Clinton supporters and delegates.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine introduced himself to America Wednesday night as a fighter, Hillary Clinton's ally and — a dad. Not just a dad to his own children but everybody's dad.

To start, he doesn't speak like a politician.

"Can I be honest with you about something?" Kaine said, "Can I be honest with you about something? I never expected to be here." He talked about his midwestern upbringing, and his own union father dad.

A day after shocking the political and foreign policy establishments on both sides of the aisle with a call for Russia to hack into Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's email, Republican nominee Donald Trump now says he was being "sarcastic."

Less than 24 hours earlier, Trump said he would welcome Russian hackers releasing any emails they could "find" from the private email server Clinton used while serving as secretary of state.

President Obama addressed the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia Wednesday night. The following is a transcript:


Twelve years ago tonight, I addressed this convention for the very first time.

President Obama will address the Democratic National Convention tonight. His speech will be an important endorsement for Hillary Clinton but also crucial to his own legacy.

Most Americans will get their first real look at Tim Kaine when he speaks at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night. Of all the people Hillary Clinton considered as her vice presidential running mate, he has the most experience at all levels of government. But there is an irony in the Virginia senator's career.

Hilda Solis, former U.S. labor secretary, took the stage at a meeting of the Hispanic caucus in Philadelphia this week and immediately launched into Spanish.

Solis, who is the first Latina to have served in a cabinet position, issued a ringing endorsement of the vice presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket.

"We are here to support Tim Kaine, our next vice president," she said. "Que habla muy bien Español. Mejor que yo!" (Who speaks good Spanish, she said, Better than I do.)

Donald Trump urged Russian agents to "find" his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton's emails and release them, an unprecedented move by a candidate for president encouraging such a foreign breach.

"Russia, if you're listening, I hope you're able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing," the GOP presidential nominee said at a news conference in Miami on Wednesday. "I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press."

Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday by officially being nominated as the first female Democratic presidential candidate at the party’s national convention in Philadelphia. The delegates from each of the states took part in a roll call vote to make it official.

After the vote was taken, many of the supporters for former candidate Bernie Sanders walked out of the convention hall. Washington state delegate Trang Nguyen was among them. Nguyen explains that she is still struggling with the idea of backing Clinton. 

Bill Clinton had a formidable challenge on Tuesday: to sell the American people on one of the most disliked presidential nominees in U.S. history. He had to "humanize" her, in punditspeak — Hillary Clinton is more of an idea or icon to people than a person, as NPR's Steve Inskeep suggested Tuesday night.

The headliner of Night 2 of the Democratic National Convention is former President Bill Clinton. Organizers say the focus of the night is Hillary Clinton's "Lifetime of Fighting for Children and Families."

Former President Jimmy Carter will speak via video. Members of the "Mothers of the Movement" group will also address the audience — their children, including Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Michael Brown, all died in high-profile incidents, many involving police.

Nine candidates are vying to replace outgoing Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn. The results of the August 2 primary will pare that list down to two finalists for the non-partisan job.

In her speech Monday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, Michelle Obama said she wakes up "every morning in a house that was built by slaves." She spoke about the feeling of watching her daughters, "two beautiful, intelligent, black young women, playing with their dogs on the White House lawn."

If Hillary Clinton wins the White House in November, she would be the first female president of the United States.

There would be a few other firsts in the family that night as well: Bill Clinton would be the first man married to a U.S. president. He would also become the first former president to become the first spouse.

Tuesday night, Bill Clinton addresses the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia to make the case for his wife. It will be his 10th time addressing the DNC.

Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

The Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia is officially underway. And Monday night was filled with speakers calling on voters to support Hillary Clinton, who is the party’s presumptive presidential nominee.

Former candidate Bernie Sanders was among them. And while he took to the stage telling the crowd he was “proud” to stand with Clinton, some Sanders supporters, including Washington state delegate Trang Nguyen aren’t ready to back her just yet. The majority of the 101 delegates from this state support Sanders, following his caucus wins in March. 

Maryland Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Georgia Rep. John Lewis will formally nominate Hillary Clinton for the presidency on Tuesday night, PBS NewsHour's John Yang and NPR's Mara Liasson report.

Role Of State Superintendent Can Be 'What You Make Of It'

Jul 26, 2016
Steven Depolo / Flickr

All nine statewide offices are up for grabs this election year, and about half don’t even have an incumbent running. It’s pretty obvious what most of these elected officials do, such as the governor or the secretary of state. But the job description for the person who runs the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, or what it takes to be successful at it, aren't quite as clear.

Ashley Jochim, a researcher with the Center on Reinventing Public Education at the University of Washington-Bothell, says the job deals a lot with accountability.

For Michelle Obama, this election is about the kids. On the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, the first lady wove her vision for the next generation with her hope for the next president.

"This election, and every election, is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives," she said, adding that Hillary Clinton is the only candidate "who I trust with that responsibility."

From the get-go, Michelle Obama was the reluctant political spouse.

She was apparently "not thrilled from the very beginning about Barack Obama's political career," going back to when he was an Illinois state senator, according to Peter Slevin, the author of a biography about Michelle Obama.

The first night of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia was marked by acrimony despite constant calls for unity by party leaders.

Still reeling from the revelations of an email leak, supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders disrupted the proceedings throughout the night with boos and jeers. A night that was supposed to mark the beginning of a party coalescing behind its presidential nominee was instead punctuated by acts of division.

Democrats' attempts to put on a unified front on the first day of their convention in Philadelphia got off to a disastrous start Monday morning.

Primary runner-up Bernie Sanders was loudly booed when he spoke to his supporters after telling them they needed to vote for Hillary Clinton and her running mate Tim Kaine.

Why would Russian President Vladimir Putin want to help Donald Trump win the White House?

That's the accusation from Democrats this week, after embarrassing internal Democratic National Committee emails appeared on Wikileaks on the eve of the party's convention in Philadelphia.

The emails were lifted earlier this year in a hacking breach that security experts have linked to Russian espionage groups.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz had an abysmal weekend, and Monday morning started out no better for her.

Her fellow Floridians loudly booed her when she spoke at her home state's delegate breakfast Monday morning. And later the Democratic National Committee chairwoman confirmed she wouldn't even gavel in the start of the convention this afternoon in Philadelphia.

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