Politics

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In an unusual electoral twist, it was the GOP establishment who claimed victory over conservatives with the primary defeat of Kansas Rep. Tim Huelskamp on Tuesday night.

Buoyed by agriculture interest groups and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, obstetrician Roger Marshall easily ousted the three-term congressman who was one of the most hard-line conservative members of the House and a member of the rabble-rousing Freedom Caucus.

Even before Hillary Clinton chose him as her vice presidential running mate, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine was on TV, explaining how he had been completely open about gifts and free travel he had accepted between 2006 and 2010 as the state's governor.

"The key was disclosure," he said on MSNBC, "and nobody's ever raised a concern that anybody who contributed, whether a campaign contributor or a gift giver, ever got anything for it."

What would Ivanka Trump do if she were sexually harassed on the job?

GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump says she would quit.

"I would like to think she would find another career or find another company if that was the case," Donald Trump told Kirsten Powers in a USA Today column published Monday.

The Department of Justice has broad-ranging powers to decide who gets prosecuted with the full weight of the federal government. And some of the rhetoric used on the campaign trail this year, especially by Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, worries some department veterans about the possibility of major political interference in law enforcement by the next administration.

President Obama reiterated that he believes Donald Trump is "unfit" to be president, issuing a sharp rebuke of the Republican nominee from the White House East Room on Tuesday.

"Yes, I think the Republican nominee is unfit to serve as president," Obama said in response to a question from a reporter during a news conference with Lee Hsien Loong, the prime minister of Singapore. "I said so last week, and he keeps on proving it."

Hillary Clinton can consider her convention a modest success. Gallup reported this week that 45 percent of Americans said they were more likely to vote for her, compared to 41 percent who said less likely.

Historically, that's not a terribly impressive number. But if you compare that to Donald Trump's convention, Clinton and her friends in Philadelphia last week did phenomenally well. Just 36 percent of Americans said the Republican convention made them more likely to vote for Trump, compared to 51 percent who said less likely.

Rep. Paul Ryan is a powerful member of Congress — he's House speaker serving his ninth term, and up for re-election. But some persuasive forces — including GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump and conservative pundit Ann Coulter — are expressing support for his Wisconsin primary opponent Paul Nehlen.

The state holds its Republican primary next Tuesday, Aug. 9.

What does a southwest Washington billionaire have in common with the former majority leader of the Washington Senate? They’ve teamed in an effort to unseat the chief justice of the Washington Supreme Court.

In an implicit rebuke of Donald Trump, President Obama praised the nation's Gold Star families, saying those who've lost loved ones in military service are "a powerful reminder of the true strength of America."

"No one has given more for our freedom and our security than our Gold Star families," Obama said Monday, in a speech to the Disabled American Veterans in Atlanta. "Our Gold Star families have made a sacrifice that most of us cannot even begin to imagine."

Now that the political conventions are over, its time to start thinking about the transition to the next president.

Yes, really.

As of August 1st, the federal government is making office space available to representatives of the Clinton and Trump campaigns to start making plans for taking over in January. If this seems a bit early, those who have been there say it's not.

"This is the most complicated takeover, not only on the planet, but in history," says Max Stier, President of the Partnership For Public Service.

The recent hacking of Democratic Party databases — and strong suspicions that the Russian government is involved — have led to new fears that America's voting systems are vulnerable to attack and that an outsider could try to disrupt the upcoming elections.

Khizr Khan, whose speech at the Democratic National Convention about his slain son has garnered admiration from Democrats and some Republicans, but ire from Donald Trump, says the candidate needs to have "patience and tolerance for criticism."

Editor's Note: This piece contains language that some readers may find offensive.

It was a hot day in Cleveland at the height of the Republican National Convention and Stevedore Crawford Jr. was angry. He stomped through the city sweating through his white T-shirt, stopping at corners to denounce police. Right next to him was his young daughter, wearing the same camouflage pants as her dad. She also wore the same white T-shirt, scrawled with Tamir Rice's name.

Tamir was a 12-year-old boy killed by Cleveland police in November 2014.

Two weeks ago, in the midst of controversy over the fact his wife, Melania, had plagiarized passages of her convention speech from Michelle Obama, Donald Trump tweeted that "all press is good press."

Japanese voters have elected Yuriko Koike, 64, as the capital's first female governor. She's taking the helm after her predecessor resigned following a funding scandal, amid high-pressure preparations for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

She triumphed over two main rival candidates. And while vote counting is still ongoing, Japanese state broadcaster NHK reports that she is "certain to win" based on exit polls.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET with a reaction from Hillary Clinton provided by her campaign.

In one of the most powerful moments at the Democratic National Convention, a Muslim father of a fallen U.S. soldier took the stage with his wife beside him and spoke directly to Donald Trump.

That father, Khizr Khan, condemned the Republican presidential nominee for proposing a ban on Muslims entering the United States.

At their party's convention this week, Democrats highlighted positive economic news from the Obama era, including the dramatic plunge in unemployment and persistent growth in output.

But then on Friday, after the gathering had ended, the Commerce Department said the economy grew at only 1.2 percent during April, May and June. Most economists had believed that the gross domestic product, a measure of all goods and services, had been growing at about 2.6 percent this spring.

As the presidential campaign heads into its final months, the U.S. is carrying out daily air sorties in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan. A major trade deal, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, waits in limbo. The U.S. has begun a long-term pivot to Asia and is bringing more Syrian refugees into the country.

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

Trang Nguyen

Hillary Clinton has accepted the Democratic nomination for president. And during her speech Thursday night at the party’s national convention, Clinton talked about the need to unify the country, saying all Americans are stronger together. She also laid out parts of her agenda if she wins in November, including her plans for creating jobs, reforming campaign finance rules and working with former rival Bernie Sanders to create tuition-free college for the middle class.

In so many ways, 1968 was a great year for middle-class Americans' wallets — and terrible for politics.

On the one hand, gasoline was cheap and unemployment was low. Real estate values were rising, helping average homeowners build wealth. Good times!

Still, many people were not feeling good — at all. In 1968, the tumultuous presidential-election year brought strident clashes at political events, third-party disruptions, calls for "law and order," racial discord and worries about foreign enemies.

Sound familiar?

When all was said and done, Team Hillary had to be pretty happy. Their four nights in Philadelphia turned out better than almost anyone expected.

Thursday night featured an orchestrated symphony of praise for Hillary Clinton and a precision-bombing of her opponent, Donald Trump.

At the Democratic National Convention this week, Bill Clinton gave a shout-out to a program called Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youth. In HIPPY, as it's called, parents receive free books, educational materials and weekly home visits to coach them on how to get their young children ready for school.

"Twenty years of research has shown how well this program works to improve readiness for school and academic achievement. There are a lot of young adults in America ... who are enjoying better lives because they were in that program," Clinton said.

On Tuesday as Hillary Clinton's was officially nominated as the first major party female presidential nominee, women (and yes, some men) all over the Wells Fargo Arena in Philadelphia danced, cried, embraced and howled with joy.

The Democratic National Convention erupted into a deafening celebration over a woman being thisclose to the presidency, 240 years after the U.S. was founded and nearly 100 years after women got the right to vote.

Washington’s state treasurer is a low-profile job with high stakes. It involves managing billions of dollars and guarding the state’s creditworthiness. The treasurer is responsible for selling billions of dollars of bonds to major institutional investors.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out her plan to address terrorist threats and create jobs.

California Gov. Jerry Brown, a Democrat, has been in politics since the 1960s, and launched multiple runs for president himself.

In 1992, he ran as the outsider candidate — chastising the incumbent parties that had "failed their duty."

"They've placed their own interest about the national interest," he said during the speech that kicked off his campaign. They've allowed themselves to be trapped and in some cases corrupted by the powerful forces of greed. It's time for them go!"

Susan Walsh / AP Photo

On Wednesday night of the Democratic National Convention, some political heavyweights took the stage to pledge their support for the presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton. There were speeches from former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine and President Barack Obama. Each of them explained how they think Clinton is uniquely qualified to be the next commander in chief.

Washington state delegate Trang Nguyen was in the audience again, listening. Nguyen says she thought Kaine's speech resonated well with Clinton supporters and delegates.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Tim Kaine introduced himself to America Wednesday night as a fighter, Hillary Clinton's ally and — a dad. Not just a dad to his own children but everybody's dad.

To start, he doesn't speak like a politician.

"Can I be honest with you about something?" Kaine said, "Can I be honest with you about something? I never expected to be here." He talked about his midwestern upbringing, and his own union father dad.

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