Politics

Political news

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has made another big-money contribution to an Oregon candidate. The recipient this time is Democratic Gov. Kate Brown.

Hillary Clinton's begrudging release of information related to her health on Sunday follows a pattern set by candidates and many who have won the Oval Office.

It is a pattern of secrecy and, in some cases, cover-ups that would be scandalous if they occurred on other issues of policy.

Two months after he resigned as Britain's prime minister, David Cameron is leaving the seat in Parliament that he first won 15 years ago.

Cameron left 10 Downing St. in July, weeks after the U.K. voted to leave the European Union.

In the House of Commons, Cameron represents Witney, in Oxfordshire. But the politician who led the Conservative Party for more than a decade says that it's now time to move on.

After five terms in office, Washington Lt. Gov. Brad Owen is retiring. The two candidates running to replace him don’t see eye-to-eye over the proper role of the lieutenant governor.

Updated 2 a.m. ET, Sept. 12

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was diagnosed with pneumonia on Friday, according to a statement issued late Sunday afternoon by her physician, Lisa R. Bardack.

The Clinton campaign provided the statement after Clinton was examined at her home in Chappaqua, N.Y. Sunday morning Clinton abruptly left a Sept. 11 commemoration ceremony in New York City. Her campaign later said she had "felt overheated."

Dr. Bardack's statement reads:

The Supreme Court on Friday temporarily invalidated Michigan's new ban on straight-ticket voting. The court let stand lower court rulings that blocked the ban from going into effect.

The straight-ticket option allows voters to cast their ballots for all candidates of one party with a single mark.

Last January, the Republican-controlled Legislature in Michigan voted to ban the straight-ticket option, which was first enacted 125 years ago and is popular particularly among black urban voters as well as in some heavily Republican areas.

Neither Oregon nor Washington are presidential election battleground states, so the region's TV viewers have been spared the attendant barrage of campaign commercials. But now the Libertarian presidential ticket is going on the air.

In story posted on the popular Facebook page Humans of New York, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton likened perceptions that she is "cold" or "unemotional" to having to learn to control her emotions as a young woman.

Clinton recounted taking a law school admissions test and having a group of men taunt the women. According to Clinton, they yelled things like "You don't need to be here" and "there's plenty else you can do."

"One of them even said: 'If you take my spot, I'll get drafted, and I'll go to Vietnam, and I'll die,'" the post reads.

You've heard it a bajillion times at this point: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are the two most unpopular major party presidential candidates on record. Both of them have unfavorability ratings of more than 50 percent.

But here's one more place that unpopularity pops up: the number of people who simply don't choose either candidate. Especially when you compare this election with 2012, a massive number of people are either choosing third-party candidates or simply have not yet decided.

President Obama repeated his argument that Donald Trump is not qualified to be president.

He urged both voters and journalists to pay careful attention to what he called Trump's "uninformed or outright wacky ideas," and not to grade the Republican White House nominee "on a curve."

"Somehow behavior that in normal times we would consider completely unacceptable and outrageous becomes normalized" during an election campaign, Obama said Thursday at the conclusion of a southeast Asian summit meeting in Laos.

Libertarian presidential nominee Gary Johnson asked a television interviewer today, "What is Aleppo?" betraying a lack of interest or even superficial knowledge of the civil war in Syria that's been raging for more than five years.

The question came during an interview on MSNBC's "Morning Joe." Panelist Mike Barnicle asked the two-time libertarian nominee and former governor of New Mexico, "What would you do if you were elected, about Aleppo?"

Luis Videgaray, Mexico's M.I.T.-educated minister of finance and confidant of President Enrique Peña Nieto, has resigned in a move widely seen as fallout from Donald Trump's visit to that country last week.

Peña Nieto made the announcement in Mexico City, but he gave no reason for the change, nor did he say whether Videgaray, a key aide since 2005, would receive a new post.

Hillary Clinton's campaign has built a massive spending advantage over Donald Trump in critical swing states heading into Election Day — a widening disparity that worries Republicans not just for the presidential race but also in the battle for the Senate.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is giving his adopted party a lot to think about. He has offered radically different approaches to trade, immigration, the size of government and national defense.

Now Republicans are debating whether, win or lose, Donald Trump has permanently altered their party's DNA.

Here are 4 questions that Republicans are grappling with:

Donald Trump plans to take his black voter "outreach" to a predominantly African-American audience with a visit to Detroit this weekend, perhaps to quell criticism that his recent speeches about African-Americans have been delivered primarily to whites.

Recently, I wrote about why many believe Hillary Clinton is in poor health. As a result, readers sent me tweets providing more "evidence" — this time, that her eyes point in different directions.

Lawmakers return to Washington on Tuesday for what GOP party leaders are hoping will be an uneventful September for their party's most vulnerable members.

"We want a clean entry and a clean exit," says one Senate GOP aide, who spoke on condition of anonymity to speak candidly about internal deliberations.

With fewer than 70 days to go before Election Day, the Republican National Committee announced it is making significant strides when it comes to competing in battleground states in the fall.

It still falls far short of the ground game already in place by Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

On Friday, the RNC announced the addition of 392 staffers and 98 new offices across 11 battleground states.

The new staff and field offices will be added in Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has been calling for a criminal investigation of his political opponent Hillary Clinton on the campaign trail this year. Trump is angry the FBI probe of Clinton's email server ended with no charges.

Now, he says, an independent outsider needs to look at the Clinton Foundation.

"The Justice Department is required to appoint an independent special prosecutor because it has proven itself to be really, sadly, a political arm of the White House," Trump said in Akron, Ohio, last week.

Washington Republicans say the way state employees collectively bargain pay and benefits is not transparent and presents a conflict of interest.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump met with President Enrique Peña Nieto at the president's official resident in Mexico City.

It was a hastily arranged visit by a presidential candidate who has spent much of his campaign insulting Mexico and its people.

On Wednesday morning, Brazil's Senate voted to impeach suspended President Dilma Rousseff.

Sixty-one senators voted in favor of removing Rousseff from the presidency; 20 voted against her impeachment.

Rousseff is accused of mishandling Brazil's budget and misrepresenting the state of the economy. Some of her accusers, as Rousseff noted in her testimony, are themselves accused or convicted of serious corruption charges.

She testified for 14 hours straight on Monday, NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro reports.

Donald Trump will give a speech Wednesday outlining his immigration stance. Given the last week of news coverage, he could have some serious explaining to do.

An immigration policy centered around extreme positions — mass deportation of 11 million immigrants in the country illegally, plus building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border — initially helped Trump stand out in the massive Republican primary field.

Three big-name political insiders have been targets of the activist, outsider wings of their parties.

And yet all three — Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Marco Rubio of Florida, as well as Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a Democrat — appear safe in their primary battles for re-election Tuesday.

JANEAN JORGENSEN / SPOKANE PUBLIC RADIO

Donald Trump's campaign has confirmed the Republican presidential nominee is coming to Western Washington for a fundraiser and a rally on Tuesday. There were rumors the campaign swing to the Northwest might not happen after Trump cancelled a similar stop next week in Portland.

Donald Trump's presidential campaign is going into five more states with a new $10 million television ad buy. It's the largest for the Trump campaign so far, which has been relatively slow to invest in TV ads, relying instead on free media coverage and the Republican nominee's large social media following.

Immigration has been a galvanizing issue in Donald Trump's campaign from the beginning.

Donald Trump's campaign has confirmed the Republican presidential nominee is coming to Western Washington for a fundraiser and a rally next Tuesday. There were rumors the campaign swing to the Northwest might not happen after Trump cancelled a similar stop next week in Portland.

Hillary Clinton has not held a single press conference since the start of 2016, triggering charges that she's trying to duck questions from reporters on the campaign trail.

In a speech Thursday in Reno, Nev., Hillary Clinton argued that Donald Trump is "helping a radical fringe" — the alt-right — take over the Republican Party.

"From the start, Donald Trump has built his campaign on prejudice and paranoia. He's taking hate groups mainstream and helping a radical fringe take over one of America's two major political parties," she said. "His disregard for the values that make our country great is profoundly dangerous."

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