Other News | KNKX

Other News

Interesting news stories from around the Pacific Northwest.

George Wing

 

This story originally aired on June 3, 2017.

In 2003, a group of four friends from various points of the country hit the trail for a bachelor party backpacking trip in the North Cascades. George Wing was the man who was getting married.

They brought all of the usual necessities for such an outing: tents, food, a first-aid kit. But George’s longtime childhood friend and master prankster, Kermit, decided to shake things up.

 

When Team USA marches into a South Korean stadium for the Winter Olympics opening and closing ceremonies next month, they'll be swathed in Northwest wool. Team sponsor Ralph Lauren used wool from an Oregon ranch for the patriotic sweaters, mittens and hats.

Phillip Male/Flickr

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories of fish out of water -- people who find themselves in places they're not sure they belong in. We start by talking to writer Rosette Royale, who after beginning an unlikely friendship, decided to plunge right into a place that always terrified him.

Courtesy of Christina Hayes

 

Thanksgiving dinner at the house where Christina Hayes grew up, in the Tri Cities in Eastern Washington, has all the normal things.

Her parents, who met in bible college, are there, along with extended family. There’s turkey and mashed potatoes and pumpkin pie: By all appearances they are a completely typical American family holiday.

“We’re playing, we’re laughing, we’re joking, we’re prepping food. We are like the Hallmark family,” Hayes said.

How a Homeless Man Helped this Writer Overcome His Fear of the Woods

Jan 20, 2018
Bryant Carlin

Olympic National Park, with its temperate rainforests and stunning views, exerts a natural pull on many Pacific Northwesterners. But it repelled Seattle writer Rosette Royale. To Royale, the park seemed like a damp, mucky, inhospitable place. "I couldn't figure out why anyone would want to haul a 50-pound pack into the wilderness and camp there for days," he said. "It didn't make sense."

Then he met Bryant Carlin.

Photograph of an illustration from Harper's Weekly, January 6, 1866, p. 8-9. Photographer: Warner, Arthur Churchill, 1864-1943, Negative #70x

“Here Come The Brides” was a short-lived television show from the late 1960s. In the show, 1860s Seattle is faced with losing its lumberjacks to other cities because Seattle doesn’t have enough women, until they import a bunch of marriageable ladies from the East Coast, and hilarity ensues.

Kind of an outlandish premise, right? Except that it really happened. Asa Mercer was president of the University of Washington (at the time they had exactly one student), and he took it on himself find wives for the loggers in Lowell, Massachusetts.

Two more Pacific Northwest athletes are heading to the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

The U.S. Olympic bobsled team will be named on Monday—and there is a good chance there will be a Pacific Northwest athlete on the team. That’s unusual because the only World Cup-class bobsled track in the Western U.S. is in Utah.

Will James / KNKX

With crowds of more than 100,000 people, last year's Womxn's March On Seattle was dubbed the largest protest march in city history. Organizers hope to do it again this weekend.

Courtesy of Nick Morrison

Back in the 1970s, before Nick Morrison was a KNKX staffer, some friends asked him if he would help them smuggle a few bricks of marijuana across the border from Mexico. He said, sure.

What came next? In the beginning, normal drug smuggling stuff. A rambler with secret compartments, a jungle, a mango orchard, an operation that seemed to be going great. But in the end? A single terrifying moment that made Morrison regret his decision - and change his ways.

United States Air Force photo by Senior Airman Alexandra Sandoval

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories of imperfect crimes. We start by talking to 88.5’s Nick Morrison, who was once hired to smuggle pot. We then meet a man who was a lifelong prankster, until one prank recalibrated his moral compass.

Derek Erdman

Age 14 is often a time of pushing boundaries, experimenting with the the distinctions between right and wrong. 

Derek Erdman tells his personal story from when he was this awkward age. It involves youthful mischief, an answering machine and the Survivor song, Eye Of The Tiger. 

Derek played a prank that went a little bit too far.  But in the end, this one event helped reshape his moral compass and put him on a better path.

Courtesy of the FBI

On August 7th, 2006, at 5:13 pm, a group of four men wearing ski masks, body armor, sweatshirts, and carrying assault rifles and pistols burst into a Bank of America branch in Tacoma, Washington. Waiting outside the bank, in the getaway car, was Alex Blum, a "good kid" who had just achieved his lifelong dream of becoming an Army Ranger.

Why did Alex throw away his dream? And how did he end up a bank robber? Alex Blum's cousin, Ben Blum, tackles those questions in his recent book "Ranger Games: A Story of Soldiers, Family, and an Inexplicable Crime."

Courtesy of Kathlyn Horan

When Seattle Police Officer Kim Bogucki stepped into the Washington Correctional Facility For Women in Purdy about 10 years ago, she had no intention of starting a non-profit.

Bogucki was doing gang prevention work and went to the prison to ask some of the women for permission to work with their children. The women were distrustful of police and gave Bogucki a chilly reception.

“Probably the last time that those mothers saw police, we were taking them away from their children,” said Bogucki.

Hacker/Flickr

In the late 90s and early 2000s, a lot of people were still figuring out this whole internet business.

As is often the case, way out ahead of the learning curve were the cyber-criminals, and law enforcement had some catching up to do.

The FBI often relied on the knowledge of private security professionals. So in 2000, they contacted a Seattle expert named Ray Pompon, and recruited him to go undercover as part of a sting operation. Pompon shared his story with host Gabriel Spitzer.

Courtesy of Tony Bamonte

 

Murder is a crime where, by its nature, it’s impossible for a victim to get justice.

 

That’s what was on Tony Bamonte’s mind as he worked to solve those crimes as the sheriff of Pend Oreille County.

 

“The police, we’re the voice of the dead,” Bamonte said. “We’re there to defend them and stick up for them and try find out who killed them. That’s who we are. They have nobody else speaking for them.”

 

Fractured bones, busted knees and concussions are just a few of the job hazards for professional ski racers. Olympians Tommy Ford and Laurenne Ross of Bend, Oregon, have had their share of spectacular crashes.

They've each bounced back from potentially career-ending injuries to compete this winter for spots on the 2018 U.S. Olympic Team.

Michael Pollack/Flickr

This week on Sound Effect, take a trip down a rabbit hole. It all started when contributor Warren Langford brought to our attention a man who was trying to track down a mystery disco musician on a cassette he found. That led us to Seattle’s first openly-operated gay disco bar in Seattle, Shelly’s Leg, and the story behind the owner Shelly Bauman. In researching Shelly’s Leg, we came across a rumor about a relative of our current President, which is quickly debunked.

Everybody loves a good mystery ... some of us more than others. So when Tom DesLongchamp discovered an unusual looking cassette tape in a bargain bin, and discovered a collection of unidentifiable disco songs on one side of it, his curiosity was aroused. That curiosity soon transformed into a fixation, or maybe even an obsession. 

By Howard Giske, CC BY-SA 3.0

The first openly-operated gay bar in Seattle was a nightclub called Shelly’s Leg. It was founded in Pioneer Square in 1973 by a woman named Shelly Bauman. It quickly became an important center of LGBT life in Seattle.

But it's the bar's origin story -- and the freak parade accident at the heart of it -- that caught our attention.

Sound Effect Producer Kevin Kniestedt sat down with Bruce Buls  a former Seattle disc jockey and good friend of Baumann’s back in the 70s, to learn more about Shelly’s Leg and its namesake. 

 

People will go to great lengths in pursuit of wealth. Mountains will be literally moved in order to make them release the mineral bounty they contain. This is the drive that led to the creation of Monte Cristo, a mining town founded in the North Cascades back in the late 1800s.

 

Today, Monte Cristo is a ghost town. Yet, it still has a hold on people like David Cameron.

 

Schuyler Bogue

 

It wasn’t so long ago that, in order to buy groceries, most people would walk into a market, hand their list over to a man behind a counter, who would then go back into the store room and get everything for them. There were generally no prices listed -- it cost what it cost. You rarely got much say over what brand you got. That was the way it was, and it was hard to imagine it working any differently.

Credit Kevin Kniestedt

This week on Sound Effect, we share the stories that won national awards this year. Our first story, from Jennifer Wing, profiles a group of men that have been playing an elaborate game of tag for decades. Next, we’ll meet Sophie, a curly-haired six-year-old girl from Bellingham who was born a boy, and learn about new research from the University of Washington that suggests trans kids who are accepted by their parents tend to have positive mental health measures.

pee vee / Flickr

This story originally aired on July 30, 2016. 

When Jena Lopez’s child started showing signs of having a non-traditional gender identity during the preschool years, she wasn’t sure what to do. Can a 3- or 4-year-old really know that she’s a different gender from her biological sex? And Jena knew the outlook for transgender kids was grim: Research has shown they tend to have high rates of depression, anxiety and suicide.

Robb D. Cohen / Invision/AP

This story originally aired on November 5, 2016.

So when we get emotional about something, we often have to weigh the risks and rewards of acting on those emotions. If someone upsets us, we need to decide if there is enough of a reward in confronting that person, while potentially facing the risks of upsetting that person as well.

I found myself in one of those situations at small-town bar in the middle of Washington, upset at a very, very famous young man, and wrote this essay.

Wikimedia Commons

 

This story originally aired on February 13, 2016.

In mid-December of 2006, a vicious wind storm hit Western Washington. Gale-force winds knocked out power, knocked down trees and knocked Charlene Strong onto a different life path.

When Strong arrived home she found her wife, Kate, trapped inside the basement of their home.  Water was rushing in, and as each moment passed, it seemed less and less likely that Kate would survive. 

Credit Gabriel Spitzer

Filmmakers in the Pacific Northwest produced a wide range of notable films this year, from short documentaries on immigrant communities to feature-length Claymation. Courtney Sheehan is the Executive Director of the Northwest Film Forum. She joined us to talk about four of her favorites: We Could Have Been Street KidsConstant Space*Float, and Lane 1974. 

*Correction: The audio version of this story referred to the director of Constant Space as Emmett Stanfield. The name of the director is Emmet Fifield. 

JAYEL AHERAM / FLICKR

 

This show originally aired on April 30, 2016.

This week on Sound Effect we present stories of war and peace.

Ground Zero

Courteosy of Tom Rogers

This story originally aired on April 30, 2016.

Naval base Kitsap-Bangor, located on the Kitsap Peninsula is one of only two military bases in the United States that houses strategic nuclear weapon facilities. It's home to several Trident submarines, which are armed with nuclear weapons. The nuclear capabilities of these submarines have long made the naval base a focus of controversy and protest.

(Credit Anders Beer Wilse/Public Domain)

This story originally aired on April 30, 2016.

During World War II, in a frozen wilderness in southern Norway, on the edge of an icy cliff sat a hydroelectric plant called Vemork. This winter fortress was the center of some of the most important sabotage efforts of the war.

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