Other News

Interesting news stories from around the Pacific Northwest.

KNKX Turns One!

Aug 31, 2017

It’s our first birthday!

On this day, one year ago, KNKX went on-air for the very first time as an independent, community station.

So, today is actually a celebration of YOU.

Thank you for your incredible commitment to saving local and national news, thoughtful dialogue, and inspiring music. We wouldn’t be here without you!

LUCY PEMONI / ASSOCIATED PRESS

This week on Sound Effect, we hear stories of what it means to pass down old tales, traditions, businesses and music to the next generation.

Jennifer Wing / KNKX

Sharon Maeda inherited a unique legacy from her grandfather. It was built around his value of community service and it involves free fruit.

As a child in Portland, Maeda would take the bus with her grandfather to visit all different types of people. Sometimes they would travel to tenements or walk down dingy hallways.

Marcus Harrison Green says people of color tend to be responsible for talking about racism to each other and to white people. But what does it look like when white people talk to each other about race?

Michal Lotzkar

After World War Two, when millions of Jews and other groups were murdered by the Nazis, the world made a promise: Never forget. But soon, the generation that remembers firsthand, the people who survived, will be gone.

AP Photo

A pianist and saxophonist, Billy Tipton became a fixture of the jazz scene in the Northwest. He frequented clubs here in the late 1940s and early '50s, first as a soloist and then with his trio.  Billy was a regular at places like the Elks club in Longview, Washington.  

After recording several albums, he decided to settle in Spokane, where he died in 1989. That's when more of Billy Tipton's story began to emerge. 

Credit Gabriel Spitzer

Out in Elma, Washington, there’s a modest dairy farm, set against the backdrop of low hills and the cooling towers of the defunct Satsop nuclear power plant. On the farm, cows are doing what cows do.

Jose Torres owns the place. But that wasn’t always the case. Jose started out as an ordinary farm worker, when this farm was owned by Bill Goeres. Bill’s father farmed around here, and so did his grandfather. But eventually, Bill became sick. He had to make a decision as to whom he would pass on this land and this way of life.

KNKX's Community Advisory Committee will be meeting on Monday, August 28 from 2 - 3:30 p.m. If you are interested in attending as a member of the listening community, please contact the general manager's office at 253-535-8732 for more information.

By Master Sgt. Lance Cheung of U.S. Air Force [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories from people who have had sports affect their lives in different ways. 

Peru’s First Winter Olympian

Roberto Carcelen was the first Peruvian to ever compete in the Winter Olympics. But just ten days before his second Winter Olympics, the cross-country skier fell while practicing, suffering major injuries. He decided to ski anyway, and inspired a country in the process. 

Medicine Game

Caleb Lacrosse Game, March 2017 by Daniel X. O'Neil is licensed under CC BY http://bit.ly/2vJ0PSa

The sport of lacrosse was created centuries ago by Native American and First Nations people from the east coast and Canada. 

These days, a group of teenage boys from the Federal Way area is learning how to play the "medicine game," which is the traditional term for the sport, from an experienced player and teacher.  

Dave Waterman is the coach of the Ohngwe Lacrosse. "I’m known as Gienhyaw. I’m from the Turtle Clan, Oneida Nation, Six nation Iroquois with the Haudenosaunee."

Aaron D'Errico

This story originally aired on July 11, 2015.

Aaron D'Errico had one dream as a child — to be a soccer star in the same manner as his father, David D'Errico, an original Seattle Sounder and former U.S. Men's National Team captain. 

But where Aaron's dreams went, his body couldn't follow. Born with cerebral palsy, Aaron was never going to be a much of a soccer player, much less a professional. That wasn't about to stop him, however.

The Friday Harbor man put pen to paper and created Ammon Walker, a comic book superhero and super-spy who uses his status as a professional soccer star as his cover. Like Aaron, Ammon has cerebral palsy. But unlike his creator, Ammon has developed technology that allows his body to overcome it.

AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth

This story originally aired on November 5, 2016.

There has been a lot of attention paid in recent years to the risks of playing professional football. While head injuries are nothing new to football, the National Football League implemented nine years ago, and has since constantly tweaked a concussion protocol, and has adjusted other rules to assist in player safety.

Courtesy Lane Czaplinski

This story originally aired on April 29, 2017.  

Lane Czaplinski has been the artistic director at On The Boards, a Seattle-based contemporary performing arts organization since 2002. He has basically been working in the arts since he graduated college. But in his senior year of college, a series of unusual circumstances led to him climbing the ranks of one of the most historic and decorated college basketball programs in the country.

Bellamy Pailthorp / KNKX

We often hear about development pressure changing communities all over the region. Case in point: A popular farm-themed shopping destination in Bothell might soon be replaced by condos.

The family that owns Bothell Country Village has a lucrative offer from a developer. It’s not a done deal yet. Some residents and shop-owners are still looking to save this neighborhood icon.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

Updated 8:48 a.m. Monday Aug. 14 with number of arrests

Seattle police have arrested three men and confiscated weapons as dueling demonstrations converged in downtown Seattle Sunday afternoon.

VIEWING 3D IMAX CLIPS BY NASA GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER IS LICENSED BY CC BY-NC 2.0 BIT.LY/2MQPQO4 / FLICKR

This show originally aired on April 1, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories from people under the influence of mentors, substances, music, and society. 

At The Throne

Kevin Kniestedt

When Brian McDonald, a screenwriter, teacher and author was living in Seattle in the mid-90s, he says that, while talented, he had seen about 15 years of closed doors as far as his career was concerned.

Knowing that the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright August Wilson also lived in Seattle, Wilson had dreams of one day meeting him and learning from him.

Credit Marianne Spellman/Popthomology

Seattle musician and artist Shannon Perry is known for her exquisite tattoo work and incredible musical presence. But six years ago, while in rehab for Adderall abuse, she felt very alone.

Perry picked up smoking again so she could socialize with the other people, but it didn't help.  Rather than go numb from the isolation and boredom, she started to make things.

Playing the drums on the floor with her hands and singing songs in a whisper, Perry used music to fill her time and she figured out a way to record these rehab writings and songs.

Courtesy of Tim Olsen

Adults are constantly influencing the kids around them, whether it's as parents, teachers or mentors. For better and for worse, key adults can shape the trajectory of children and inspire their path as those children grow up.

Tacoma native Tim Olsen found a mentor in local guitar maker and musician Harvey Thomas. Fifty years later, Olsen still reflects on his old role model with a wry smile.

"He was a true eccentric, through and through," says Olsen.

Courtesy of Bethany Morrow and Will Taylor

The world of children’s books is lily white. The vast majority of people writing kids’ books are white and their characters are usually white, too.

 

There are more animals and trucks that appear as characters in kids books than there are African-American characters.

 

Jeff Chiu / AP

The early cancelation of federal grants for sexual health education has raised protests from King County officials.

Public Health Seattle & King County was supposed to receive $5 million over five years. But earlier this summer, the Trump administration said the program would end after three years.

Pike Place Farmers Market Express by Seattle City Council IS LICENSED BY CC BY-NC 2.0 http://bit.ly/2f6qsJp / Flickr

This week, stories of food and the people who love to make it. 

One More Round

In Ethiopian culture, drinking coffee is an extremely social affair. It's all about relaxing with friends and family. Seattle native Solomon Dubie wants to bring that to his Rainier Valley coffee shop, Cafe Avole. He gives us a taste of what it's like to drink from the traditional Ethiopian coffee pot, the jebena. 

Dinner In The Dark

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

This story originally aired May 6, 2017. 

Solomon Dubie is the 29-year-old founder of Cafe Avole, a cozy little coffee shop in Rainier Valley. It’s one of the only places in Seattle you can get Ethiopian coffee brewed the traditional way — in a jebena. It's basically a clay pot with a long neck and short spout.

Solomon was born and raised in Seattle, but his family is from Ethiopia — where the coffee plant was first discovered.

They take coffee seriously. But it’s not just about the taste; it’s a whole event with three unique rounds of brewing.

Courtesy of The Blind Cafe

This story originally aired May 28, 2016.   

This week on Sound Effect our theme is “Out of the Darkness,” but KPLU’s Ed Ronco and Ariel Van Cleave found that going into the darkness can shed a lot of light on the world around you, and even your own personality.

The Blind Café is a pop-up event that travels the country, offering guests the chance to have dinner in the dark. Not candlelight. Not a dimly lit room. We’re talking total, 100 percent, pitch black.

Soul Food: Seattle Chef Kristi Brown Talks Culinary Power

Aug 5, 2017
Courtesy of Kristi Brown

This story originally aired February 4, 2017. 

At age 13, Kristi Brown knew she would be a chef, but she remembers planning multi-course meals by the time she was 5.

"I'm a big believer in working on your purpose," she says, "That really is the only answer that you have if you want to be happy."

Courtesy of Edwin Martinez

This story originally aired April 8, 2017.   

Edwin Martinez runs Onyx Coffee in Bellingham, Washington. The shop is a bit unusual. Martinez calls it "a mad scientist lab" for studying human behavior with coffee.

He sells just coffee and nothing else, not even cream.  The coffee comes straight from his family’s farm in the mountains of northwest Guatemala.

"So if you love coffee, you are just in seventh heaven." said Martinez. "But if you aren't here for the coffee, this is the most disappointing coffee house in America."

The Fox News Channel and a wealthy supporter of President Trump worked in concert under the watchful eye of the White House to concoct a story about the death of a young Democratic National Committee aide, according to a lawsuit filed Tuesday.

The explosive claim is part of a lawsuit filed against Fox News by Rod Wheeler, a longtime paid commentator for the news network. The suit was obtained exclusively by NPR.

Messy Kitchen by Mark Knobil is licensed by CC BY-NC 2.0 bit.ly/2lXrOpi

This show originally aired on March 4, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, stories of what happens when things get messy, for better and for worse.  

Fun With Slime

In the 1990s and early 2000s, kids television channel Nickelodeon became popular for dumping bright green slime on everyone and anyone. Lizzie Neilson had the opportunity to get slimed as a kid and lived to tell the tale. 

The Writing On The Wall

Courtesy of Lizzie Nielson

This segment originally aired March 4, 2017.

Seated in a bucket, ears plugged, grinning through the cascade of green, oozy chaos, fourth-grade Lizzie Nielson lived a Nickelodeon fan’s dream.

“I have all the paperwork in order to suggest that I was slimed,” says Nielson.

 

She does, in both photographic and certificate form, lest anyone doubt this point of pride.

 

Courtesy EPA Gorst Creek Removal

This segment originally aired March 4, 2017.  

Most abandoned landfills do not have a happy ending. Kitsap County alone has dozens of them, sitting around and festering in the ground.

But one place, called the Gorst Creek Landfill, is finally getting cleaned up, thanks to some very dedicated peninsula residents and $27 million from the Navy.

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