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Unless lawmakers can agree on a budget, the state of Washington is just days away from a first-ever government shutdown. Gov. Jay Inslee Wednesday called a third special session and demanded that House Democrats and Senate Republicans get to the table and get a deal.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

The shooting death of Charleena Lyles by Seattle police has once again brought the use of deadly force into the spotlight. Friends and family of Lyles have asked why other less-lethal force wasn’t used when two officers responded to an attempted burglary report at Lyles’ apartment Sunday morning.

Oregon lawmakers want to make it harder for federal immigration agents to find people living in the country illegally.

Will James / KNKX

A vigil for Charleena Lyles turned into a rallying cry for family members, neighbors, and hundreds of other residents who demanded answers about her death.

Mourners crowded a square outside Lyles's apartment complex Tuesday evening, two days after she was shot in her apartment by two Seattle Police officers. Lyles was black and the two officers are white. 

"I just want to grieve right now," said Lyles's younger sister, Tiffany Rogers. "I can't even do that because I'm so angry. I'm scared of our so-called protectors. I was before, but I definitely am now."

Washington state officials say people in Eastern Washington need to hunker down for a likely dust storm and possible wildfire conditions Tuesday night.

Simone Alicea / KNKX

The site of Washington state's first black-owned bank is on its way to becoming what developers hope will be a hub for the neighborhood's modern black community.

The Liberty Bank project on 24th Avenue and East Union Street broke ground Monday. The groundbreaking ceremony coincided with Juneteenth, which commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

Like many new developments in the Central District and around the city, the project is set to become high-rise housing with businesses on the ground floor.

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

SEATTLE (AP) — A Seattle police officer involved in a fatal shooting asked his partner to use a stun gun on the woman authorities say was brandishing a knife, but police audio transcripts show the other officer said: "I don't have a taser."

Authorities say 30-year-old Charleena Lyles confronted the two officers Sunday when they responded to a burglary call at her apartment. Family members have questioned why police didn't use non-lethal options when they knew Lyles had been struggling with mental health issues.

On Monday, Seattle officials released dash cam audio of a Sunday morning police shooting that left Charleena Lyles, a pregnant mother of three, dead. The two Seattle police officers had been called to Lyles' apartment so she could report a burglary.

The shooting is under investigation by the Seattle Police Department's Force Investigation Team, and also SPD's Office of Professional Accountability, but here's what we know now:

About 90 minutes north of Stockholm lies an ancient defensive hillfort called Broborg. Northwest scientists are digging up and studying pieces of the ancient Swedish fort and trying to figure out how the structure has lasted around 2,000 years.

Kevin Kniestedt / KNKX

Affordable housing is certainly a big issue these days, especially if you are living in the greater Seattle area. But it is also a major issue on some of our islands.

On San Juan Island, an overwhelming shortage of affordable housing is threatening the community and economy. But a non-profit in Friday Harbor is come up with a way to help that problem: by picking up old houses that are no long wanted in Victoria, British Columbia, putting them on a boat, and giving them a second life in Friday.

Law enforcement prepared for protesters and counterprotesters on the Evergreen State College campus in Olympia, Washington, Thursday afternoon—the day before this year's graduation ceremony.

Simone Alicea / KNKX

Seattle City Council members heard from dozens of speakers Wednesday evening during the first public hearing at City Hall on a proposal to enact a citywide income tax.

Mayor Ed Murray and council members Lisa Herbold and Kshama Sawant unveiled the legislation Monday evening. The council passed a resolution in May saying it planned to consider and pass an income tax ordinance by July.

The current proposal is a two percent tax on income more than $250,000 per year for individuals and more than $500,000 for couples who file their taxes jointly. 

Online retailer eBay wants to stop an internet tax proposal in the Washington Legislature. To do that the company is rallying its customer base.

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

The majority of teachers across the country are white. But the student population is much more diverse. A panel of local education experts will be on stage at Town Hall Seattle June 15 for an event called #EducationSoWhite to talk about how that gap can impact everyone inside schools.

When I started my career at The Washington Post in the late 1990s, the newsroom wore a dusty, outdated look as if it were paying homage to its legendary past. The Post of today occupies an updated building on D.C.'s renowned K Street, in modern, glass-walled offices with a Silicon Valley aesthetic.

There are just 10 days left in Washington’s second legislative overtime session. And still there’s no sign of a budget deal.

A brand new flight will send fresh cherries from Seattle to Shanghai, China, several times a week starting June 18.

Courtesy of The Evergreen State College

 

As protests overtook the Evergreen State College last month, students watched their school become a national symbol of campus radicalism.

Videos circulated of students shouting down professors and administrators amidst protests around race and equality. That attention led to threats of violence that shut down the Olympia campus for three days.

If you were worried you had cancer, who would you call for information? Chances are a federally-funded cancer helpline isn't the first place that pops into your mind.

But for 40 years, a helpline funded primarily by the National Cancer Institute has been answering people's questions about cancer.

Rachel Macy heard the man before she saw him.

“He was saying that he was a taxpayer and this was his train,” said Macy, a member of the Klamath tribe from Southern Oregon. “And that people of color were ruining the city.”

Macy was on the MAX train when a man began screaming racist things at two teenage girls and other passengers and stabbed three men. Two of them died. Now Macy fears the color of her skin could make her a target for other racists.

Ted Warren / AP Photo

The Seattle City Council approved a tax on sugary beverages in a 7-1 vote Monday. 

After months of debate, the council passed a 1.75 cents-per-ounce tax on beverage distributors. The drinks affected include soda, sports drinks and energy drinks.

Diet drinks, baby formula, medicine, weight-loss drinks and 100 percent fruit juice were explicitly exempted. It's unclear whether syrup-flavored coffee drinks like lattes will be included.

Several thousand people gathered in downtown Portland Sunday for competing right- and left-wing rallies following the fatal stabbing of two men by a man shouting anti-Muslim slurs.

The day of speeches and chants was ending in chaos late Sunday afternoon after police say Antifa protestors threw bricks and other projectiles at them. That prompted officers to close two public squares and use pepper spray, flash-bang grenades and rubber bullets. They also detained several dozen left-wing protestors, though it's not yet clear how many people were actually arrested.

If you give blood, usually it goes into a plastic bag in a fridge until someone needs it. But when you’re deep in the countryside or tundra or out at sea, there’s no hospital—and no blood bank.

Grouting up a tunnel that was found collapsed last month at Hanford is the best option according to Washington state’s top expert on Hanford. And it won’t preclude further cleanup of the radioactive waste inside.

Now that it's legal in Washington state, a handful of farmers and the Colville tribe have submitted applications to grow industrial hemp. On Tuesday, Moses Lake will be the scene of a "first planting" demonstration of the non-drug cousin of marijuana.

Washington State Chief Privacy Officer Alex Alben thinks it’s time for an online consumer bill of rights. He discussed the idea Thursday on TVW's "Inside Olympia" program.

"That's the old industry," Tom Auvil tells me, nodding toward an apple orchard that we're driving past. We're near Wenatchee, Wash., which calls itself the Apple Capital of the World. Auvil grew up in the apple business, and until recently, he was a horticulturist for the Washington Tree Fruit Research Commission.

Kevin Scott / Courtesy of Coltura

Imagine being trapped inside a bubble filled with the hazy exhaust fumes from a car. You might be sputtering, coughing as your throat constricts with the smoke.  This eerie scene will be played out in a performance art piece in downtown Seattle.

When Matthew Metz, a lawyer by trade, switched to an electric car, he wondered why so many people he knew were passionate about the environment, but still so attached to their gas-powered cars.  He decided public art was the best way he could get people to stop and think. 

Will James / KNKX

Tacoma officials' plan to reduce the impacts of homelessness on public health began this month with the installation of a water line and portable toilets at one of the city's largest encampments.

But those amenities are scheduled to be on-site for six weeks at most. City leaders are still figuring out exactly what happens next. 

Paula Wissel / knkx

In many ways, the region’s homeless crisis is very visible, from tents on sidewalks to panhandlers in the street. But, artist Xavier Lopez remembers feeling invisible when, as a 10 year old,  his family was homeless. His exhibit, "Hope/Home" runs through June 16 in Seattle's Municipal Tower in downtown Seattle.

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