There's a new term that has become popular in city planning circles: tactical urbanism. The idea is that small experiments, done cheaply and quickly, can make cities better, and more nimble.

Some of the tactics are guerrilla methods: citizens might paint a crosswalk where they believe one should exist, or post their own road signs where they find the official ones confusing.

Across the country, DIY urbanists have been leaving their mark on cities — and now city governments are trying to bring them into the fold to harness their ideas.

Harrison Walker of Reading, Pa., bikes everywhere he goes.

He can't afford a car — he just got out of prison. He's living in a halfway house and finding temporary automotive work around the city.

"I do my errands about town," he says. "Sometimes I'll ride as far as Walmart. It's a nice ride, it's about a 40-minute ride, so I don't mind. I've rode most of my life."

Elaine Thompson / AP

Cities around the globe are competing for jobs, and especially good, middle-class jobs. A new study says Seattle has fallen a bit behind some other cities, in part, because of problems with infrastructure.

The study compares Seattle with cities around the world that are a similar size and type of economy – for example, San Francisco, Singapore, Boston, Amsterdam.

Jennifer Wing / KPLU

Cities could ease traffic congestion by following the example of colleges and universities, according to a study released Thursday.

The national study by the WashPIRG Foundation says elected officials should look to places like the University of Washington when shaping transportation policy.

City of Tacoma

It will soon be easier to walk or bike around the Puget Sound region, thanks to nearly $17 million in federal funding to build and expand foot bridges, trails and pathways.

The funding from the Federal Highway Administration will benefit 16 transportation projects in King, Pierce, Snohomish and Kitsap counties.

Seattle Department of Transportation

Seattle’s Fremont Bridge has seen an uptick in bike traffic, according to the Seattle Department of Transportation.

Weekly totals of two-wheeled travelers jumped 28 percent in October and November compared to the same time last year, data recorded by the bridge’s bike counter shows.

SDOT’s Craig Moore said it’s hard to pinpoint a cause of the growth in ridership, but the recent dry stretch likely played a role.

ebis50 / Flickr

Here’s some good news on the first day of National Bike Month: Washington leads the nation as the most bike-friendly state!

This is the sixth straight year Washington has topped the ranking determined by The League of American Bicyclists.