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Arts and culture

Seattle Public Library

 

If you’re a local musician or band looking for new ways to get your music out there, you’re in luck. The Seattle Public Library has opened its submission period for a project called “Playback.”

Seattle librarian Nancy Pearl shares her under-the-radar reading recommendations with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep. This year's picks include mysteries, nonfiction and a fantasy story for young readers.

(These recommendations have been edited for clarity and length.)

Danny Hajek and Shannon Rhoades produced and edited this segment for broadcast. Nicole Cohen adapted it for the Web.

Geoffrey Redick

 

 


David Jones is the head of the music department at Peninsula College. He loves all types of music. He hears how different styles and formats influence one another, thrilling with the commonalities between classical and jazz, playing pop into fuller melodies.

 

Graywolf Press

Tess Gallagher was born in Port Angeles in 1943. She was the oldest of five children, and she says her childhood was full of responsibility. Her parents worked hard, cutting down trees, and Tess helped them, marking the fallen logs.

KSQM

About 10 years ago, a new radio station took to the air in Sequim.

KSQM was established in large part to be an emergency broadcaster. Its founder, Rick Perry, felt the area needed some way to receive information quickly in the event of an earthquake, power outage, or other emergency.

The Northwest Folklife Festival starts Friday and runs through Memorial Day. The annual gathering highlights different cultures found in the region through stories, art, film, dance, food and song. There will even be opportunities for festival-goers to take the stage.

Amanda Bedell / SIFF

The 44th Annual Seattle International Film Festival kicks off Thursday. It is said to be the largest and most highly-attended film festival in the country. More than 145,000 people are expected to attend the 25-day festival at several Seattle-area venues.

More than 400 films from 90 countries will be shown, with some films geared toward younger audiences. And, for the tenth year, SIFF has selected some young people to help judge which of those films are the best. KNKX Morning Edition host Kirsten Kendrick talked with three of them.

Nordic Museum CEO Eric Nelson talks to reporters on Tuesday, May 1, ahead of the museum's grand opening. The ribbon cutting is set for May 5.
Ed Ronco / KNKX

The new Nordic Museum is set to open this weekend in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood.

The $50 million building stretches along Market Street in the city’s Ballard neighborhood. It boasts 57,000 square feet of space, including a long “Fjord Hall” that runs the length of the building, separating exhibits about the Nordic countries on one side, and the Nordic experience in America on the other side.

Tacoma Concert Band Founder and Conductor Retires

Apr 26, 2018
Tacoma Concert Band

 

 


Robert Musser is passionate about music. His eyes light up as he talks about a passage that gives him chills. His voice fills with emotion as he describes his career as an educator and conductor.

 

Studio5Graphics / flickr via Compfight

Seattle City Light wants to transform its historic Georgetown steam plant building into a museum and cultural center – with a twist. The search is on for a nonprofit partner to provide programming that emphasizes something called “STEAM” education.  

The publisher of Sherman Alexie is postponing the release of the paperback edition of the author's memoir about his mother, You Don't Have to Say You Love Me.

Hachette Book Group says it took that step at the writer's request. The decision comes after a number of allegations of sexual harassment have been leveled against the writer, who is perhaps best known for his novel The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.

In the opening scenes of the documentary film United by Water, writer Sherman Alexie reads his poem ‘Powwow At The End Of The World.’

     I am told by many of you that I must forgive and so I shall

     after an Indian woman puts her shoulder to the Grand Coulee Dam

     and topples it. I am told by many of you that I must forgive

     and so I shall …

Writer Sherman Alexie last week issued a statement admitting he "has harmed" others, after rumors and allegations began to circulate about sexual harassment. Without providing details, Alexie said "there are women telling the truth," and he apologized to the people he has hurt. Now, some of those women have come forward to speak to NPR about their experiences with him.

Noir City Film Festival Comes To Seattle

Feb 15, 2018
Courtesy of SIFF

 

SIFF’s Noir City film festival kicks off Friday with 18 movies being shown over the course of a week.

Author and so-called “Czar of Noir” Eddie Muller will be introducing the films and discussing them with the audience. Muller spoke with KNKX traffic reporters, Adam Gehrke and Sprince Arbogast, for their podcast “Cinema Squabble” ahead of his appearance in Seattle.

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET

Ursula K. Le Guin, a prolific novelist best known for the Earthsea series and The Left Hand of Darkness, died Monday at the age of 88. Across more than 20 novels and scores of short stories, Le Guin crafted fantastic worlds to grapple with profoundly difficult questions here on Earth, from class divisions to feminist theory.

Then-Washington Secretary of State Ralph Munro, second from left, aboard the Russian ship Marshal Krylov, in 1992, during its visit to Seattle.
Washington State Archives

Twenty-five years ago this week, a Russian missile tracking ship journeyed into Elliott Bay, inviting Americans aboard for tours and turkey.

It was an unheard of gesture between two countries that had, only a year earlier, been bitter rivals. And it’s part of a new exhibit at the Washington State History Museum.

Ciara Lacy

 

This year’s Indigenous Showcase at Seattle’s Northwest Film Forum comes to a close Saturday. The annual event has been around for a decade and has given many Indigenous filmmakers an outlet to tell stories about their culture.

In the 1940s, construction of the Grand Coulee Dam ended a generations-long tradition among the region’s Native American tribes who had gathered at a nearby waterfall every year. But last year, five tribes revived that tradition.

Andrea Morales / S-Town


It all started with an email with the subject line, “John B. McLemore lives in (expletive) Town Alabama.” For reporter Brian Reed, it was a gateway into the long and twisting saga that would become S-Town.

Maurice Caldwell

Preston Singletary is an internationally recognized blown-glass artist who lives and works in Seattle. He uses his art to share the traditions of his Tlingit culture. But over the last few years he’s been working on another project as a way to communicate those Native traditions. Only this time, it’s with music.

 


When you were younger, do you remember there being a piano store in your neighborhood or at the mall? There are many fewer piano dealers today than there used to be. Those who weren't done in by cheaper electronic keyboards or the last recession are changing their tunes to stay in the money.

A new film based on an award-winning novel by a Portland author is playing across the country this summer. It’s star hails from Yakima, Washington.

As campaign slogans go, it was a good one: "Keep Zombies in Washington."

And it worked in the end. The Washington Legislature late Friday voted to renew the state's film production tax breaks.

A guest stares into one of Yayoi Kusama's pieces titled, 'Infinity Mirrored Room—Love Forever.' The Infinity Mirrors exhibit runs June 30 through September 10 at the Seattle Art Museum.
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Seattle was the first American city to host Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama’s work in 1957.

Now, more than six decades worth of Kusama’s work is at the Seattle Art Museum after a stint at Washington D.C.’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

It all began rather simply.

"Mr. and Mrs. Brown first met Paddington on a railway platform," goes the opening line in the opening book of Michael Bond's Paddington Bear series. Readers, for their part, first met the orphan bear from Peru in 1958, in the pages of A Bear Named Paddington.

He brooded, as Lincoln.

He seduced in The Unbearable Lightness of Being. And he murdered, in There Will Be Blood.

This week, Daniel Day-Lewis — a three-time Oscar winner, and incomparable film chameleon — announced he is retiring from acting at 60.

A statement released by his spokeswoman gave no explanation, saying this is a private decision, and that Day-Lewis will have no further comment.

The actor has often taken lengthy sabbaticals between films, but this time it's apparently permanent.

So what will he be doing?

On the heels of his historic induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame (and amid unconfirmed rumors of new arrivals to his family), Jay Z has announced his thirteenth solo studio album, 4:44, to be released on June 30.

John Avildsen, the man behind the camera for a string of beloved blockbusters in the 1970s and '80s, died Friday at age 81. The Oscar-winning director of Rocky and The Karate Kid died of pancreatic cancer in Los Angeles, his son Anthony told The Los Angeles Times.

Nearly 2,000 years after he held sway over ancient Rome, a notorious emperor is again causing outrage. The reason: Italian authorities approved construction of a massive stage amid the ruins over the Roman Forum for a rock opera about Nero, who ruled from 54 to 68 A.D.

Archaeologists and art historians are up in arms, denouncing what they see as the commercialization of the country's heritage.

The 2016 Tony Awards were fun, but undeniably a little anticlimactic. By then, it was in large part a coronation of Hamilton, a delivery mechanism for the many, many awards we all knew it would win. (And did.)

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