Robin Lloyd

Midday Jazz Host

Robin Lloyd was born and raised in the Detroit area. She performed radio plays in junior high and high school, took various radio apprenticeships in high school and college, and has held a number of different positions at community and public radio stations in Michigan and Western Washington, including Jazz and Blues Host, Producer, Production Manager, Station Operations Manager and Program Director. Robin is married to drummer Michael Slivka; together they manage a household full of dogs, cats and percussion.

Her most memorable KNKX moment: dancing with the Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians on stage at Jazz Alley on my birthday.

Ways to Connect

americansabor.org

This week on Saturday Jazz Caliente, we'll hear the theme song of the orchestra known as Machito and his Afro-Cubans.  The piece is called "Tanga," composed by trumpeter and arranger Mario Bauzá.  This "Tanga" had nothing to do with skimpy underwear; the song title was derived from an African word for marijuana.

Jazz at Lincoln Center

The Grammy Awards show will be televised this Sunday, Feb. 12, at 5 p.m. PST.  This week on Jazz Caliente, we're featuring music from all five Grammy nominees for Best Latin Jazz Album, and believe me, I'd be hard-pressed to pick a "winner" this year.  They're all outstanding recordings.

Geraldine Wyckoff

The Cultural Exchange Pavilion at this year's Jazz and Heritage Festival in New Orleans will feature musicians from Cuba, like revered jazz pianist Chucho Valdes (the "Duke Ellington of Cuba") and timba stars Los Van Van.  The "heritage" part of this annual festival is all about acknowledging the many international influences present in New Orleans culture, food and music. 

Most jazz fans are familiar with Brazilian samba and bossa nova, since those musical styles have mixed with jazz beautifully for decades.  But Brazil is a large diverse country with many other regional rhythms and musical styles that also blend nicely with jazz.  

Seth Wenig / AP Photo

On this week's Saturday Jazz Caliente we'll hear some of maestro Eddie Palmieri's original music for the documentary "Doin' It in the Park," a film by Bobbito Garcia about the pick-up basketball game culture in NYC's parks.

sonando.org

Get to know two of the local Latin jazz groups featured this week on Saturday Jazz Caliente: Sonando and the vintage Brazilian jazz outfit called Choroloco.

"El flautista cubano Orlando Valle 'Maraca'" by Maracavalle is Licensed under CC BY 3.0 bit.ly/2hYevpM

The flute may not be as prominent in jazz as trumpet or saxophone, but a well-played flute solo can really punch up a Latin jazz tune.

The flute came to Latin jazz through a number of paths.  Here are examples of the two main contributors:

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

Inspired by Seattle’s places and historical events, the Steve Griggs Ensemble plays music with a message. Griggs, a saxophonist, composer and writer addresses social injustice with music and words, telling the story of the International District’s Panama Hotel, where Japanese-Americans left their possessions when they were incarcerated in internment camps during World War II.   

Mark Peterson/Corbis

In Tito Puente's musical career that spanned six decades, he earned the nickname "El Rey" (The King), three times:  King of the Timbales,  Mambo King and King of Latin Jazz.  

waynewallacelatinjazzquintet.com

You wouldn't necessarily expect Bloomington, Indiana to be a hotbed of Afro-Cuban, Caribbean and South American jazz.  

Think again.  

International Music Network

Cuban pianist are known throughout the world as among the best.  This week, we'll feature some of the modern-day Cuban piano stars:  Chucho Valdes, Omar Sosa and Emilano Salvador.  

The piano arrived in Cuba in the late 18th century and was quickly elevated to favored instrument status, especially for popular dances like the guaracha and contradanzas.  Thus began the Cuban piano tradition. 

Emma-Lee Photography

Female instrumentalists of all types have been part of jazz since its inception, but for many of them getting recognition and acceptance has been a long, hard road.  Even more so with Latin jazz, it seems. Times and attitudes do change, albeit slowly.  

Here are three talented, dedicated, and creative women making their mark in Latin jazz, and serving as mentors and inspiration for an upcoming generation:

Robin Llloyd 2013

Everyone is talking about Cuba.  

Fidel Castro's death combined with uncertainties about the incoming U.S. administration's stance on trade and aid in Cuba has put the island in the spotlight once again.  

It's a land of contrasts, that's for certain.  It's also a compellingly beautiful place with warm, funny, smart, resilient people.

We were delighted to have the effervescent Adriana Giordano bring her EntreMundos Quarteto into the knkx studios for a live Jazz Caliente.  This popular Brazilian-flavored band has fans all over the Northwest, and they’re celebrating the release of their long-awaited CD, “Brasilidade.”  Enjoy!

Latin Jazz is rich with compelling percussion sounds.  Many of the percussion instruments originate from Africa, and are tied to spiritual and religious ceremonies.  Here are a couple of favorites:

lpmusic.com

Latin jazz musicians believe in showing respect to the elders and originators of the music.  This week we feature 95-year-old conga drum master Candido Camero and we remember Cuban composer, arranger and bandleader Chico O'Farrill.

Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

An inventive and effusive pianist and composer, Marina Albero moved to Seattle from Barcelona only two years ago.  It didn’t take long for her to connect with the very best regional musicians to help her showcase her amazing mix of Spanish, Afro-Cuban and world-jazz music.  Be mesmerized by this special live Jazz Caliente studio session!

Lena Adasheva

This week we feature music from some of the nominees for Best Latin Jazz Album for this year's Latin Grammys.  The awards show will be on November 17 in Las Vegas.

pachecopiano.com

On this debut of the hour-long Jazz Caliente, I feature some music from Cuban pianist/composer Jorge Luis Pacheco.  The wonderful folks who joined me on the 88.5 Travel Club trip to Cuba in 2013 were amazed at this young man's performance at the Havana jazz club La Zorra y El Cuervo.  He's performing in Bellingham on Sunday, in Olympia on Wednesday, Nov. 9 and popping in to the Royal Room on Thursday, Nov. 10 to join the show with the Entremundos Quarteto and the Brazilian drum and dance group VamoLá.

A little over four years ago, we asked 88.5 knkx listeners if they wanted to hear more Latin Jazz in our Mid Day Jazz programs.  The response was overwhelmingly positive, and so the Jazz Caliente feature debuted at 2 p.m. on  Thursday July 19, 2012.  The 3-song, 15 minute set of Afro-Cuban and Brazilian jazz has been a highlight of Midday Jazz afternoons.

maceoparker.com

The Earshot Jazz Festival and Seattle Theatre Group will present Maceo Parker on Saturday, October 29 at the Moore Theatre.  As you may know, Mid Day Jazz on the new 88.5 knkx is home to the occasional feature, The Maceo Mandate, wherein we encourage listeners to take a break and "shake it loose" with the music of Maceo Parker.

Philadelphia has bred an astonishing number of great jazz musicians, like John Coltrane, Philly Joe Jones and so many more.  According to 81-year-old drummer Albert "Tootie" Heath, "Some guys joke and say it's in the water;  a lot of wonderful people that I grew up with and experienced playing with came out of Philadelphia."

Chicago native saxophonist Chico Freeman has spent the last decade being a citizen of the world.  Now back in New York City as his home base, he's taken to the road to promote his latest recording, "Spoken Into Existence."  We were delighted to welcome Freeman to Seattle, along with bassist Kenny Davis, Luke Carlos O'Reilly at the piano and Michael Baker on drums. 

Legendary drummer Elvin Jones was a good friend and mentor to Freeman, and the first tune played on this session, "Elvin" is a tribute to Mr. Jones and a showcase for drummer Michael Baker. 

chicofreeman.com

Saxophonist Chico Freeman has been on a 10-year journey of discovery. 

"I always wanted to try to live in another place, besides the United States.  I went from Chicago to New York, and I always had it in my mind that I wanted to base myself somewhere else in the world.  I wanted to edify myself about other cultures and how people express music relative to their cultures," he says. 

Sony Pictures Classics

"Don't play what's there.  Play what's not there." -Miles Davis

Taking the iconic trumpeter's advice to heart, writer/producer/director/lead actor Don Cheadle begins the film "Miles Ahead" with what (or who) wasn't there:  Miles Davis from late 1975 through 1980, his "lost" or "silent" years.

Michael Jackson

Drummer Matt Wilson delights in being a little different.  His enthusiasm for the quirky is infectious, as I found out in our phone conversation last week.

Augusta Sagnelli

Clarinetist Anat Cohen's transcendent appearances with the Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra last February are still resonating.

"I loved the trip to Seattle, loved meeting all the people there, the SRJO and other musicians. It was great time, and a wonderful hang," she said. "Everybody there is so nice.”

Her latest CD, "Luminosa" features a number of beautiful Brazilian melodies.  Anat first encountered the varied styles of Brazilian music when she was a student at the Berklee College of Music in Boston.

edreedsings.com

Singer Ed Reed and saxophonist Anton Schwartz met almost 10 years ago in the San Francisco Bay Area.  Ed was 78 years old at the time, and was just beginning to get recognized as a jazz singer.

Partly due to his love of jazz, Ed has survived drug addiction and multiple prison terms.  Four CDs later, he’s been on the Downbeat Critic’s Poll list of “Rising Stars” for six years, topping that list in 2014. 

el diario archive

Born and raised in Cadiz, Spanish pianist Chano Domínguez recently moved his family to Seattle, adding a flamenco touch to our outstanding musical scene. 

"I have played in so many places around the world and in the USA, and for me, Seattle is one of the most wonderful cities.  We are very happy to be here," he says.

"I grew up in a poor family in the south of Spain, in Andalusia.  It was hard, because I didn't have an instrument, and I cried every year for a flamenco guitar. 

Dorothy Darr

Saxophonist Charles Lloyd is a mystic, a nature lover and a sound-seeker.  He seems to inhabit an enchanted space, and considers himself in service to the music, which he must share. 

"It changes the molecules," he explains. "People seem to brighten up, and I brighten up, and we all get blessed." 

He also has an uncanny ability to look backward and forward at the same time, which makes for some interesting conversations.

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