Laurel Wamsley

Hope Solo, the goalkeeper who was a key part of winning U.S. teams at the Olympics and World Cup, has announced her candidacy to be the next president of U.S. Soccer.

"What we have lost in America is belief in our system, in our coaches, in our talent pool, and in the governance of US Soccer," Solo wrote in an extensive Facebook post on Thursday. "We now must refocus our goals and come together as a soccer community to bring about the changes we desire."

Pope Francis isn't pleased with the words to the Lord's Prayer — specifically, the part about temptation.

In an interview with an Italian TV network, the pontiff said that the current language of the Our Father prayer "is not a good translation."

Updated 5:40 p.m. ET

Former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar, who has admitted to sexually assaulting minors, has been sentenced to 60 years in prison for child pornography.

Airlines including American, Delta and Alaska have announced restrictions on so-called smart luggage because the lithium-ion batteries found in many of these suitcases pose a fire risk.

These kinds of bags have proliferated in recent years, including motorized suitcases you can ride and one pitched as an autonomous "robot companion" that follows you around.

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When we're grocery shopping, most of us don't seek out foods that have passed their "Best Before" dates. But a chain of grocery stores in England is asking consumers to do just that.

In an effort to reduce food waste, the East of England Co-op says that it is now selling items that are up to a month past their "Best By" dates in its 125 outlets, with prices reduced to just 10 pence (about 13 cents).

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

An independent review of Charlottesville's handling of the white nationalist rally there in August found that law enforcement and city officials made several significant mistakes, resulting in violence and distrust.

The city commissioned the report, which was prepared by Timothy Heaphy, a former U.S. attorney in Virginia. In conducting the investigation, Heaphy said his team pored through hundreds of thousands of documents, interviewed hundreds of witnesses, and reviewed countless hours of video and audio.

Argentina's navy has announced that it is no longer looking for survivors on the submarine that disappeared more than two weeks ago but will continue to search for the missing ARA San Juan.

British politicians are loudly condemning President Trump's retweets yesterday of incendiary anti-Muslim videos posted by a leader of the far-right Britain First party.

A small wooden boat washed ashore in the Akita prefecture of Japan on Monday. Inside the ghost ship were the bodies of eight people, partially skeletonized.

The Japan Coast Guard said it was working to determine the nationalities of the dead, but a Japanese Coast Guard official told The Associated Press that one of the men was holding North Korean currency.

The closed-circuit television footage is silent, but that makes it no less dramatic.

A jeep speeds through the North Korean countryside, crossing what is known as the 72-Hour Bridge.

Inside the vehicle is a North Korean soldier, making a desperate escape. All but the headlights disappear behind tree cover.

The Federal Communications Commission chairman announced plans Tuesday to repeal Obama-era regulations on Internet service providers. The 2015 rules enforce what's called net neutrality, meaning that the companies that connect you to the Internet don't get to decide which websites load faster or slower, or charge websites or apps to load faster.

Hundreds of victims of the Oct. 1 shooting in Las Vegas filed five lawsuits in Los Angeles Superior Court on Monday.

The largest of the suits names 450 plaintiffs. Among those being sued are MGM Resorts International, owner of the Mandalay Bay resort; Live Nation, organizer of the country music festival at which 58 people were killed; and the estate of Stephen Paddock, the shooter.

Comedian Sarah Silverman confronted one aspect of the wave of sexual abuse and misconduct revelations that have come out in recent weeks: the anguish when the perpetrator is a friend.

Updated at 2:51 p.m. ET Thursday

It's been nearly 11 months since President Trump's inauguration, when major protests took place in the streets of Washington, D.C. Storefronts and vehicles were damaged, and police used pepper spray and other tactics to subdue the protesters.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved its first digital drug: a pill embedded with a sensor that transmits whether someone has taken it.

Although the approval is a big step for digital medicine, there are concerns about privacy, convenience and cost.

Less than a week after the iPhone X release, a Vietnamese security firm says it has done what others couldn't — trick the phone's facial recognition software. How? One very creepy mask.

In what may be the crucial missing piece in the investigation into the Russian state doping program, the World Anti-Doping Agency said it is in possession of the database of test results from Russia's anti-doping laboratory.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Aly Raisman, captain of the gold-medal U.S. gymnastics teams at the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, says she was abused by former team doctor Larry Nassar.

Raisman, 23, told CBS' 60 Minutes in an interview airing Sunday that Nassar first treated her when she was 15. She says she spoke to FBI investigators about Nassar after the 2016 Summer Games in Rio.

Pope Francis has a request for his followers: Put away your phones during Mass.

At a certain point in every service, Francis noted, "the priest says, 'Lift up your hearts.' He doesn't tell us to lift up our cellphones to take pictures."

Germany's highest court has ruled that the country must provide a third gender option beside male or female in the nation's birth register — or dispense entirely with information on gender in civil status.

The government is dropping its case against the woman who laughed out loud during Attorney General Jeff Sessions' confirmation hearing in January.

Desiree Fairooz is an activist with the anti-war organization Code Pink. She said her laugh was involuntary, spurred by Sen. Richard Shelby's statement that Sessions' "extensive record of treating all Americans equally under the law is clear and well-documented."

Sutherland Springs, Texas, is a small town.

"They say the population is 400 and that's if you count every dog, cat and armadillo," 75-year-old L.G. Moore told The Associated Press. "It's more like 200 people." He runs an RV park a quarter mile from the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs.

Sutherland Springs is a small South Texas town, about 45 minutes southeast of San Antonio. On Sunday morning, some of its residents went to services at the First Baptist Church downtown.

Then a gunman shattered the calm of the morning. Devin Patrick Kelley, a 26-year-old from New Braunfels, a city 35 miles north, arrived dressed in black, wearing body armor and firing an assault-style rifle. He shot at the church building itself. And then he went inside and fired on the worshippers. He killed at least 26 people and wounded some 20 others.

Updated at 3:28 p.m. ET

Just a week ago, the employees at local-news websites DNAinfo and Gothamist in New York voted to unionize.

Thursday evening, the publications' billionaire owner, Joe Ricketts, announced that he was shutting them down.

Five of the eight people killed in a truck attack on a popular bikeway in Lower Manhattan on Tuesday were part of a group of 10 close friends who had traveled to the city to celebrate the 30th anniversary of their high school graduation.

The nurse who was roughly arrested at a Salt Lake City hospital has settled with the city and the university that owns the hospital for $500,000.

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