Kevin Kniestedt | KNKX

Kevin Kniestedt

Producer, Sound Effect

Kevin began his career at KNKX in 2003, where his first responsibility was to eradicate the KNKX Jazz Library from all Smooth Jazz CD’s. Since then there is not much at KNKX he hasn’t done. Kevin has worked as a full time jazz host, news host, and has hosted, at least once, almost every single program on KNKX. Kevin currently produces 88.5's weekly show Sound Effect. Kevin has conducted or produced hundreds of interviews, has won local and national awards for newscasts and commentary, and helped make the KNKX Grocery Tote famous.

Kevin's most memorable KNKX radio moment was his interview with Edgar Martinez right before his last home game. Kevin lives the seemingly never-ending bachelor life in Seattle, where you may find him hitting a tennis ball, catching an independent film or eating a massive plate of nachos.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy Caprice Hollins

So, there’s this online test. The faces of people of different races flash up on your screen along with words, like good, bad, sweet and bitter. And you have to immediately click on one of the words when you see the face. It tests our implicit racial biases in a way that’s really hard to fool.

The results can be enlightening. Or horrifying, because it turns out almost all of us have implicit bias.

NIAID

This week on Sound Effect, stories of bugs in the system. We first head to the Burke Museum where baby beetles eat away at the flesh of dead animals, down to the bone, so scientists can have a clean specimen. Next, we talk to one of the best known food safety attorneys in the world about how his career took shape.

Credit NIAID/Flickr

Seattle Attorney Bill Marler is often thought of as a bug…an agitator…an annoyance to the beef and poultry industries, and even the companies that grow leafy greens. He’s the guy you call if you are unfortunate enough to fall victim to E. coli, salmonella, listeria, or any other bacteria that somehow works its way into mass food production and into your stomach.

E. Coli entered everyday lexicon when three people died and hundreds of others were sickened after eating Jack In The Box hamburgers back in 1993. One of the epicenters of the outbreak was here, in Washington State.

El-Toro/Flickr

This week on Sound Effect, we hear stories of people who learned to hustle.

The Cookie Hustle

They may seem sweet (and they are), but sisters Hayden and Rena Korbol mean business. They are two of the top cookie sellers for the girl scouts in Western Washington, selling over 1,600 boxes each last year.

The Bootleg King

Courtesy Gracelynn Shibayama

College is really expensive. People take out loans, they work a million odd jobs, and if you’re lucky, you have parents who set up a college fund. When Gracelynn Shibayama was 17 years old, she had a college fund. But then, she got an email from her parents.    

“We had to use your college fund to pay for Calvin’s rehab. So, at that point it was like, Oh, this is getting really serious and if I want to go to college, and I thought that was going to be there, I’m going to have to start thinking about it now,” says Gracelynn.

WINDY ON WASHINGTON 123 BY DAVEYNIN LICENSED UNDER CC BY 2.0 BIT.LY/2Q6JJFY / FLICKR

 

This show originally aired on May 13, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, stories of that moment when everything changes for better or worse.

It's Showtime

Courtesy Marvin Charles

This story originally aired on May 13, 2017.

Marvin Charles is the co-founder of a Seattle organization called DADS —Divine Alternative for Dads Services. Marvin and his wife, Jeanett, help men from all walks of life get back on their feet, find work and ultimately, reconnect with their kids.

Now, you might think that Marvin must be one of these parents who know all — a go-to person whose advice is golden and who comes from a loving home himself.

This is how Marvin’s life started. But then things got really complicated.

This week on Sound Effect, we hear stories of people who refused to give up.

Billy Idolator

Credit Chris Cozzone

Tricia Arcaro Turton’s career started with a big fat “no.” She says she was never one to be discouraged just because someone tells her she can’t do something. And at a young age, she was told that she couldn’t be a 

boxer. She decided to write off the sport all together.

But later in life she would undergo grueling training, and eventually became a professional boxer. This, of course, came after she played elite rugby on the United States national team. She’d rack up 8 wins and 4 losses as a boxer before retiring in 2005, and now she has her own gym.

Credit Gabriel Spitzer

Out in Elma, Washington, there’s a modest dairy farm, set against the backdrop of low hills and the cooling towers of the defunct Satsop nuclear power plant. On the farm, cows are doing what cows do.

Jose Torres owns the place. But that wasn’t always the case. Jose started out as an ordinary farm worker, when this farm was owned by Bill Goeres. Bill’s father farmed around here, and so did his grandfather. But eventually, Bill became sick. He had to make a decision as to whom he would pass on this land and this way of life.

By Master Sgt. Lance Cheung of U.S. Air Force [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories from people who have had sports affect their lives in different ways. 

Peru’s First Winter Olympian

Roberto Carcelen was the first Peruvian to ever compete in the Winter Olympics. But just ten days before his second Winter Olympics, the cross-country skier fell while practicing, suffering major injuries. He decided to ski anyway, and inspired a country in the process. 

Medicine Game

AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth

This story originally aired on November 5, 2016.

There has been a lot of attention paid in recent years to the risks of playing professional football. While head injuries are nothing new to football, the National Football League implemented nine years ago, and has since constantly tweaked a concussion protocol, and has adjusted other rules to assist in player safety.

VIEWING 3D IMAX CLIPS BY NASA GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER IS LICENSED BY CC BY-NC 2.0 BIT.LY/2MQPQO4 / FLICKR

This show originally aired on April 1, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, we share stories from people under the influence of mentors, substances, music, and society. 

At The Throne

Kevin Kniestedt

When Brian McDonald, a screenwriter, teacher and author was living in Seattle in the mid-90s, he says that, while talented, he had seen about 15 years of closed doors as far as his career was concerned.

Knowing that the Pulitzer Prize winning playwright August Wilson also lived in Seattle, Wilson had dreams of one day meeting him and learning from him.

Messy Kitchen by Mark Knobil is licensed by CC BY-NC 2.0 bit.ly/2lXrOpi

This show originally aired on March 4, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, stories of what happens when things get messy, for better and for worse.  

Fun With Slime

In the 1990s and early 2000s, kids television channel Nickelodeon became popular for dumping bright green slime on everyone and anyone. Lizzie Neilson had the opportunity to get slimed as a kid and lived to tell the tale. 

The Writing On The Wall

Courtesy Ruby Brown

This segment originally aired March 4, 2017.  

Former 88.5 KNKX Jazz Sunday Side Up host Ruby Brown had known for a long time that her brother Andy had battled mental health issues. But it wasn’t until last summer when he took his own life that she and her family were able to understand the extent of it.

Credit Kevin Kniestedt

This story originally aired on March 18, 2017. 

More than 23,000 people lost their lives following the 1985 eruption of Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia. In response, the United States Geological Survey and the U.S. Agency for International Development's Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance created the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program, to help prevent other volcanic eruptions from becoming disasters.

Bookstore by Jordy Templeman is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 bit.ly/2lMHyhJ

This show originally aired on February 18, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, we bring you stories of TMI, as in too much information. 

The Jeopardy Champ

Seattle resident Ken Jennings won 74 times in a row on the popular trivia show "Jeopardy!" and is the the second highest earner in game show history with a total of more than $3.1 million. He explains how he keeps all that information in his brain.

The Home of The Cloud

Credit Allie Ferguson

This segment originally aired February 18, 2017. 

Ken Jennings says knowing a lot of random facts can really come in handy when it comes to bringing people together — connecting with total strangers. He says having random knowledge about someone’s job or alma mater is a little bit like knowing about a person before you even get to meet them.

Jennings says that the trick to being able to consume and retain so much knowledge is largely due to a wide interest in everything, because people are more likely to retain things that they are interested in.

This story originally aired on December 3, 2017.

Lynette McMillan had a small, quiet family, relatively speaking. She and her husband were raising three kids on a ranch in Soap Lake, Wash. They took a trip to a friend's place, a couple that had taken in foster kids and giving them a better life than what they had previously. This was the inspiration for the McMillans to become foster parents themselves. 

(courtesy Nancy Leson)

This story originally aired on June 18, 2016.

Nancy Leson, half of knkx's  Food for Thought duo, has been in the food industry for a long time. But some of her earliest memories of food come from bars -- not as an employee, but as a patron — a six-year-old patron. 

Leson grew up in Philadelphia, in a time and place where children were allowed to belly up to bars and eat Slim Jims and pickled eggs, or order a Coke with loads of  Maraschino cherries. 

The reason Leson wound up in those bars was that that was where she would find her mother. 

Courtesy Arrington De Dionyso

Editor's note: The audio version of this story contains language some readers may find inappropriate.

Sometimes the things that keep us up seem to come out of nowhere. Something we might never have given a second thought to all of a sudden, for reasons we can’t quite understand, become front and center in our life.

That’s what happened to Arrington De Dionyso. He’s a painter and musician from Olympia.

(AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

The Seattle Mariners are a little over a week away from wrapping up the first half of the season, and the M’s have taken their fans on a roller coaster ride so far. Countless injuries and stretches of winning streaks followed by losing streaks have toyed with the emotions of their loyal supporters.

Kevin Kniestedt / KNKX

Affordable housing is certainly a big issue these days, especially if you are living in the greater Seattle area. But it is also a major issue on some of our islands.

On San Juan Island, an overwhelming shortage of affordable housing is threatening the community and economy. But a non-profit in Friday Harbor is come up with a way to help that problem: by picking up old houses that are no long wanted in Victoria, British Columbia, putting them on a boat, and giving them a second life in Friday.

“McNeil Island and neighbors” by worldislandinfo.com is licensed under CC BY 2.0 bit.ly/2tseyeM

Note: Some of the content in this story might be upsetting to some listeners. 

McNeil Island in South Puget Sound is where the Special Commitment Center for sexually violent predators is located. There are about 250 permanent residents at the Special Commitment Center -that’s what they’re called — and there are only a few ways you can leave the facility: you die, you’re deemed to have successfully completed treatment, or you can challenge your commitment with a trial.

AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

There’s been a lot of talk this week about the possibility that former San Francisco 49er Colin Kaepernick may likely end up as the backup quarterback for the Seahawks. Kaepernick got a lot of attention last year for kneeling during the national anthem at football games, and was an arch rival to the Seahawks during his time in San Francisco.

KNKX sports commentator Art Thiel says that for starters, nothing has actually happened yet. The Seahawks have admitted that they have expressed interest in Kaepernick, but some things have to happen before he becomes a Seahawk.

From left: Hanna Brooks Olsen, Sarah Anne Lloyd, Alex Hudson
Seattlish

The blog "Seattlish" is closing up shop. For four years, the website covered politics in Washington state, with a special emphasis on Seattle city government.

Credit Kevin Kniestedt

As the years go by, it can be harder and harder to find singers and bands that still perform the original charts from the '30s and '40s, which include Ella Fitzgerald's first big hit with the Chick Webb Orchestra, the 1938 recording of “A Tisket, A Tasket.”

In Tacoma, you can find the Swing Reunion Orchestra doing just that. The Swing Reunion Orchestra performs free concerts at the McKinley VFW in Tacoma the last Mondays of the month, and first and foremost, they want their music to sound authentic.

Simone Alicea / knkx

For our show this week, we wanted to talk to someone who hears lies all the time: Tow truck drivers. That’s what Sound Effect Executive Producer Erin Hennessey suggested. She sent 88.5’s Simone Alicea to a towing company in Bellevue to talk to someone who’s heard it all.

But it turns out Erin wasn’t being totally forthcoming, herself, about the role she had cast for these drivers. She and Simone sat down to compare notes about their impound experiences.

Parker Miles Blohm

If you were to take a look at Grace Kelly’s resume, you might assume she’s in her fifties or sixties. To her credit, she has 10 album releases (including the recently released "Trying To Figure It Out"), several awards, performances with the Boston Pops, a performance for President Obama, and collaborations with dozens of top flight musicians. But she has done all of this by age 24.

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