Ed Ronco | KNKX

Ed Ronco

All Things Considered Host

Ed Ronco came to KNKX in October 2013 as producer and reporter for KNKX’s Morning Edition. Ed started in public radio in 2009 at KCAW in Sitka, Alaska, where he covered everything from city government, to education, crime, science, the arts and more. Prior to public radio, Ed worked in newspapers, including four years at the South Bend (Ind.) Tribune, where he covered business, then politics and government.

Ed grew up in Wyandotte, Mich., a suburb of Detroit, and earned his bachelor’s degree in journalism from Michigan State University.

Ways to Connect

Matthias Leibing / Flickr

We’re heading to Berlin this week on “Going Places.” KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley visits with Shlomit Lasky. She’s a journalist and tour guide who was born in Israel. They met at a bar to talk about her experience in Germany, which is steeped in a very particular history and culture.  

Interview Highlights

Elaine Thompson / AP

Back when Michael Tulee was in school in 1966, his teacher sent a note home asking parents to send treats to class for an upcoming Columbus Day celebration.

“And I seem to really recollect, even to this day, that my mother was upset, even back then,” said Tulee, who is executive director of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

Postdoctoral researchers at the University of Washington are taking a step toward unionizing. They’re working with UAW Local 4121, which represents academic student employees at the university.

Manu Fernandez / AP

Matthew Brumley has long urged travelers to avoid the crowds.

Among other things, the KNKX travel expert encourages people to take off-season trips and find lodging  away from the hot spots in big foreign cities.

Lui Kit Wong / AP File Photo/The News Tribune

Officials hope changes they have unveiled to the White River will help control flooding.

The King Flood Control District marked the completion of a big levee project this week in the city of Pacific. They hope to save nearby property by letting the river spread out a little.

John Raoux / AP

One of the region’s largest blood banks is sending some of its supply to help victims of the shooting in Las Vegas.

On Sunday night, a gunman opened fire during a music festival where 58 people have died and more than 500 were injured.

Bloodworks Northwest is asking donors of all blood types to help replenish local supplies and help with the ongoing needs in Las Vegas.

Matthew Stinson / Flickr

Editor's note: This is an encore presentation of a "Going Places" episode that originally aired on Oct. 15, 2015.

Hainan Province, an island in the South China Sea, is one of China’s most popular tourist destinations. It’s also where former KNKX Production Assistant Shunying Wang grew up.

Gary Davis / KNKX file photo

For a lot of people, fall means a return to routine. The kids are back in school, for example, and organizations start having meetings again.

The official start of autumn this week has KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley thinking about breaking up that routine through quick getaways.


Michael and Debbie Campbell, the "Senior Nomads," near Almaty, Kazakhstan this summer.
Senior Nomads

About four years ago, Michael and Debbie Campbell sold their home in Seattle, put their things in storage, and began living full-time in Airbnbs. Since then, the self-described “Senior Nomads” have stayed in 68 countries and 168 different homes.

They told us about their adventures on a previous edition of “Going Places.” But now they're on to new things.  

Getting out of your usual surrounds -- even if you're just hopping a water taxi to a different neighborhood -- can be a nice change of pace for not a lot of money.
Ed Ronco / KNKX

Sometimes we all need a change of pace. Vacations are good for that, but they can cost money and time. This week on “Going Places,”  KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley talks about quick, local, affordable getaways.


brando.n / Flickr

Students in Seattle, Tacoma and elsewhere in western Washington head back to school next week. Chances are at least some of them will spend time talking to friends about what they did over their summer vacations.

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley took his family to the United Kingdom and Taormina, Sicily. Over the summer, he was also nice enough to send us updates from both England and Italy.

Going Places: Seeing Foreign Cities On Two Wheels

Aug 24, 2017
People ride bikes in Amsterdam.
Matthew Peoples / Flickr

If you live in Seattle, you’ve seen a lot of infrastructure pop up to accommodate bikes: Bike racks, then bike lanes, then bike traffic signals. Now there are bike sharing programs in the city.

Getting around on two wheels is often more common outside the United States. KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley says it can give people a new perspective when they’re visiting foreign cities.

Leaving Seattle's waterfront aboard KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley's boat on a sunny -- and slightly smoky -- Thursday evening in August.
David Dodman

Editor's note: An earlier version of the audio on this segment misstated the size of the state ferry system. Washington State Ferries is the largest ferry system in the country.

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley was on a ferry from Seattle to Bainbridge Island when he heard something from a couple visiting from Kansas.

"Sure is pretty around here," Brumley remembers one of them saying, "but wouldn't want to live here with all of this water."

In this March 9, 2016 file photo, people wearing protective glasses look up at the sun to watch a solar eclipse in Jakarta, Indonesia.
Dita Alangkara / AP

When there is a solar eclipse, eye doctors do a lot to warn people about the dangers of looking at the sun without proper eye protection.

Ed Ronco / KNKX

Updated 8:48 a.m. Monday Aug. 14 with number of arrests

Seattle police have arrested three men and confiscated weapons as dueling demonstrations converged in downtown Seattle Sunday afternoon.

Emily Clott leads an architecture tour on the Chicago River, for the Chicago Architecture Foundation.
Ed Ronco / KNKX

The art museum in Chicago is often hailed as one of the nation’s best. But many of the city’s biggest works of art are along the river.

The buildings of Chicago tell a story that spans the city’s history – from squat warehouses that once held goods for mail-order catalogs, to gleaming skyscrapers made of glass.

Jeff Chiu / AP

The early cancelation of federal grants for sexual health education has raised protests from King County officials.

Public Health Seattle & King County was supposed to receive $5 million over five years. But earlier this summer, the Trump administration said the program would end after three years.

Courtesy of The Blind Cafe

This story originally aired May 28, 2016.   

This week on Sound Effect our theme is “Out of the Darkness,” but KPLU’s Ed Ronco and Ariel Van Cleave found that going into the darkness can shed a lot of light on the world around you, and even your own personality.

The Blind Café is a pop-up event that travels the country, offering guests the chance to have dinner in the dark. Not candlelight. Not a dimly lit room. We’re talking total, 100 percent, pitch black.

Earthbound Expeditions

We’ve all seen the books: An author picks up and moves to Europe, simple as that, rediscovers himself or herself, and then, after the book is out … so are they.

Maria Cannavo, on the other hand, moved to Sicily about a dozen years ago and is still there. She spoke with Earthbound Expeditions co-founder Danna Brumley about why she stayed:

“It was always in my mind and it was certainly always in my heart,” Cannavo said.

In 2000, her family rented a villa in Tuscany. A good visit, she said, though not her first. But Italy really grabbed her.

Evan Hoover / File photo

Hot weather could pose problems over the next week across western Washington.

The National Weather Service says temperatures in the Puget Sound region will push into the upper 90s by Thursday, maybe crossing above 100 degrees. The record in Seattle is 103, set in 2009.

Onofrio, with Earthbound Expeditions co-founder Danna Brumley, at his shop La Pignolata Guinness, in Taormina, Sicily.
Matthew Brumley / KNKX

KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley loves visiting Italy.

In Taormina, Sicily, he was walking down a narrow street when he found himself drawn into a bakery full of cannoli.


The water off Cornwall isn't much warmer than Puget Sound, but it's good for wading or a bracing swim, and the scenery is stunning.
Matthew Brumley / KNKX

In the heat of the British summer, many families escape their busy city lives for a calmer, cooler time near the sea.

This week on Going Places, we find KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley doing as the British do, in Cornwall.


Seattle Channel

Ballots have been mailed out across the region for the Aug. 1 primary.

In Seattle, it’s a two-sided ballot that includes 21 candidates for mayor. And ahead of the election, two government TV channels have put together a video voters’ guide.

The video messages cover every race for Seattle and countywide offices. Candidates get two minutes to make a statement.

All the candidates are recorded in a studio in front of the same backdrop.

Elise Morin moved to the Seattle area from France when she was 16. Her parents opened a bakery in Seattle's Belltown neighborhood.
Ed Ronco / KNKX

Bastille Day, July 14, marked a turning point in the French Revolution in 1789. These days, it’s marked as a day of national celebration.

We’re using it as a good reason to talk to our friend Elise Morin, who was born and raised in France and moved to the United States just a few years ago, at age 16, when her family came to open La Parisienne bakery in Seattle’s Belltown neighborhood.

5 Tips For Taking Your Family On Vacation

Jul 6, 2017
Climbing above Lake Michigan, at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore,
File Photo / Flickr

This story was originally published Jan. 16, 2014.

So, you're planning the next big family vacation. There are a lot of questions to consider: Where to go, what to do, who to invite. In this encore presentation of Going Places, KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley shares advice for families looking to travel together.

Opening Day at the Ballard Locks, July 4, 1917. Hiram M. Chittenden -- for whom the locks are now named -- would never see this day. He was alive still, but too sick to attend the ceremonies. He would die a few months later.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle District

The Ballard Locks are officially called the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks.

The name appears on signs as you come into Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood and on the property of the locks themselves.

Hiram Martin Chittenden was a district engineer for the Army Corps of Engineers, around the time the plan for the locks was finalized and put into motion. And his life story is nothing short of amazing.

The Puget
Parker Miles Blohm / KNKX

This story was part of KNKX's presentation of All Things Considered live at the Ballard Locks.

Luke Makay with Footprints Tours leads visitors through Oxford.
Matthew Brumley / KNKX

What does an experienced travel guide do when he's on vacation? Why, he signs up for a guided tour, of course.

That's what KNKX travel expert Matthew Brumley did in Oxford, England, where he and his family have stopped on their summer vacation. He met Luke Makay, with Footprints Tours, who was nice enough to share some of his insights about Oxford and its famous university.

Veteran luthier Rick Wickland works on part of a violin bow at his work bench inside Hammond Ashley Violins, in Issaquah. The horse hair used on the bow is hanging behind him.
Ed Ronco / KNKX

At one end of the long building that houses Hammond Ashley Violins in Issaquah, five students are getting ready for a violin class.

In the middle of the building, luthiers are repairing violins and cleaning string basses.

And up front, behind a door marked “Suite 100,” customers are coming in to buy or rent violins, and get them repaired.

The countryside near Bernières sur Mer, Normandy.
Olivier Engel / Flickr

We've talked about France many times before on Going Places. But this week, we're going to see the country through a slightly different perspective.

Joan Harkins lives in Seattle and recently started importing cider and calvados — a French apple brandy — from the Normandy region of France. She spends a lot of time traveling in the more distant parts of the countryside, away from the path usually beaten by tourists.

Her recommendations:

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