What Can And Can't You Do Under Washington's New E-DUI Law

Texting or holding a phone to your ear while driving is already illegal in Washington state. But starting Sunday, Washington state troopers and local police will begin enforcing a toughened law against distracted driving .

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Elaine Thompson / AP

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says he is not resigning following claims by four men that he sexually abused them as teenagers.

The State Department has issued new instructions about which citizens from the six Muslim-majority countries covered by the Trump administration's travel ban are eligible for visas.

The instructions issued to U.S. embassies and consulates widen the definition of a close familial relationship to include categories such as grandparents and cousins, in accordance with a federal court ruling last week, a State Department spokesman said in a statement to The Two-Way.

Will James / KNKX

Environmental activists are the most vocal group in Tacoma politics today.

That's a new development in a city known as a hub of heavy industry. But growing concerns about fossil fuels and pollution are already shaping the race for the next mayor.

Ted S. Warren / AP Photo

Teachers have been in short supply in Washington state in recent years. In a survey of school principals last fall, 20 percent said they were in a crisis mode in terms of hiring certificated teachers, and another 70 percent said they were struggling but getting by.

Jim Levitt

Barçelona natives and Seattle residents since 2014, Marina Albero and Serena Dominguez were joined by Evan Flory-Barnes in a Ballard Jazz Walk concert during the 15th Annual Ballard Jazz Festival in May.  They performed and improvised on a variety of music including references to Spanish traditional and classical music as well as original music by all three performers in solo, duo and trio settings.  One highlight was "La Finestra," a song by Marina Albera's father and Serena Dominguez' grandfather, Mariano Albero. 

This segment originally aired on February 18, 2017.

This week on Sound Effect, we bring you stories of TMI, as in too much information. 

The Jeopardy Champ

Seattle resident Ken Jennings won 74 times in a row on the popular trivia show "Jeopardy!" and is the the second highest earner in game show history with a total of more than $3.1 million. He explains how he keeps all that information in his brain.

Credit Allie Ferguson

This segment originally aired February 18, 2017. 

Ken Jennings says knowing a lot of random facts can really come in handy when it comes to bringing people together — connecting with total strangers. He says having random knowledge about someone’s job or alma mater is a little bit like knowing about a person before you even get to meet them.

Jennings says that the trick to being able to consume and retain so much knowledge is largely due to a wide interest in everything, because people are more likely to retain things that they are interested in.

Will James / KNKX

This segment originally aired February 18, 2017. 

The electronic data we use isn't as ephemeral as it seems. Our photos, videos, and email take up physical space in the world.

Patty Martin knows this. Some of it ends up outside her kitchen window. 

Martin lives in Quincy, a rural Washington town that happens to house vast chunks of the internet in gigantic data centers. 

Quincy, a town of about 7,000 people in a bowl of gentle hills, was known for food processing plants that turned potatoes into French fries.

Courtesy Scott Losse

This segment originally aired February 18, 2017. 

For comedians like Seattle’s Scott Losse, sharing lots of information about their flaws and their family members is just a given. He goes on stage in front of a live audiences telling jokes about things like his lifelong issues with anxiety and his deep love for his 16-year-old cat named Kitty.

But comedy often comes from pain, and that's true for Scott. When he was younger, Scott lost his two older brothers — one from suicide, the other, in a car accident.

3 Generations Of Diaphragm Defeat

Jul 15, 2017
Courtesy of Sarah Anne Lloyd

This segment originally aired February 18, 2017.   

After years of bad experiences with hormonal birth control, at 19, I thought I had found a holy grail: The diaphragm. It was 2006, and nobody used diaphragms anymore, but I knew all about them — because since I was about 10 years old, I knew that my very existence depended on my mother leaving hers in the dresser drawer one cold winter day in January of 1986. I was conceived under the dining room table, on the shag carpet of their Fremont apartment.

“Be careful,” she said. “You were a diaphragm baby.”

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Tim Durkan / Tim Durkan Photography

Lots Of Clouds, But Forecast Is Warm And Dry – Will Seattle Break Its Dry-Day Record?

Drizzle and light showers fell in a few places this week, especially in the south end of the Puget Sound region. But for most of the region, including Seattle, rain has been missing for more than a month. KNKX weather expert Cliff Mass says there’s a good chance the emerald city will break a record with this dry spell.

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Donating Your Vehicle To KNKX Has Never Been Easier