Sewage Seeps In Washington Town Desperate For State Funds

The sewage system is crumbling in Carbonado, Washington, near Mt. Rainier. And if Washington lawmakers fail to pass a capital construction budget before they adjourn Thursday, a plan to replace it—and many other projects around the state—will be put on hold.

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Students on the UW Campus
AP Photo

High anxiety is coursing through public colleges and universities these days. Federal funds for programs that serve first-generation college goers and minority students are on hold. College counselors know it as the tipping point', that period between a student's first and second year, when drop out rates historically increase. "When I entered college I was this shy little kid." Corbin Sonneman will start his second year at Pierce College Fort Steilacoom next month. He credits the school's Student Support Services program with helping him stay in school.

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A company hoping to build the first commercial wave energy project on the West Coast has cleared a major hurdle. The developer has reached a preemptory settlement with concerned parties and government environmental agencies. KPLU's Tom Banse has details. The master settlement is the product of three years of negotiations between the company Ocean Power Technologies and a dozen different community groups and government agencies. The New Jersey-based marine energy developer wants to moor an array of wave power buoys about two-and-a-half miles offshore of Reedsport.

AP

If you love jazz, then you know it's often a family affair. Here's one example: the Heath Brothers Quartet performed this weekend at Jazz Port Townsend, with Jimmy Heath on tenor saxophone and Tootie Heath on drums. Along with their late brother Percy, the Heaths are just one of the great sibling stories in jazz. In this week's installment of our Artscape series, KPLU's Kirsten Kendrick and Nick Morrison discuss more musical families as part of a list that Nick prepared for NPR.

Images from refugee camps
Souchinda Viradet Khampradith, Chakrya Lim, Choy Vong and Sam Ung / Courtesy Photo

On April 30th, 1975, the Vietnam War ended. But that was only the beginning for millions of Vietnamese, Laotians and Cambodians, as they desperately found ways to leave their war torn countries. An account of refugees' struggles and hardships is now on exhibit at Seattle's Wing Luke Museum. This is the story of two refugees who came here to start a new life.

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Kate Whoriskey
Chad Batka / Courtesy Photo

For the first time in her theatrical career, Kate Whoriskey can contemplate decorating an office. Because now she actually has one.
"I'm trying to work on posters and I'm hoping to do something with the ceiling. Because it's a little bit barren," she says.
Except for an orchid and a couple of stuffed animals for her 21- month-old son Rory, there isn't much else personalizing her new space. But she's still transitioning - from New York theater freelancer to artistic director at Seattle's Intiman Theatre.
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Bret Walker
Cass Walker / Courtesy Photo

The photos stand in a homey, makeshift gallery. On the floor of a garage in Clyde Hill. Owner Cass Walker has moved the cars out of the way to make room for her series of large mostly black- and-white images that tell the story of her older brother Bret.

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Here’s a rare treat; a solo performance from 6-time Grammy Award-winning vibraphonist, Gary Burton. In his 50-year (and counting) recording career, Burton has recorded with many different group configurations and has done a number of duo recordings with artists including bassist, Steve Swallow, guitarist, Ralph Towner and most famously, pianist, Chick Corea, but we rarely get to hear him all by himself.

Jazz guitarist, Martin Taylor, is one of our favorite guests in the KPLU/Jazz24 studios. Not only is he widely acclaimed as perhaps the finest solo, acoustic jazz guitarist alive, he’s always great company. Whenever his touring schedule brings him to Seattle, we make sure he pays us a visit.

Liam Moriarty / KPLU

For most of his career, Edmonds artist Michael Reagan drew life-like portraits of the rich and famous; movie stars, sports figures, six presidents, the Pope. But several years ago, he started drawing pictures of American soldiers killed in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and offering them free to the families.

The artist - who's also a Vietnam vet -- feels this gift to the loved ones left behind is a kind of healing, not only for the families, but for himself.

from The Italian Country Table
by Lynne Rosetto Kasper

Ingredients

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Nuclear Reactor Building
Flickr photo "UW Nuclear Reactor Building" by Max Morley is licensed under cc by 2.0 http://bit.ly/2uO7n5B

Seattle Wins Legal Fight With UW Over Landmark Preservation Regulation

A legal fight between the City of Seattle and the University of Washington has ended in a victory for the city. The state Supreme Court said university buildings can be designated as city landmarks.

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Donating Your Vehicle To KNKX Has Never Been Easier